The Spirit of the Public Journals: Being an Impartial Selection of the Most Exquisite Essays and Jeux D'esprits...that Appear in the Newspapers and Other Publications, Volume 2

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R. Phillips, 1825
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Page 16 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 415 - GOOD night? ah! no; the hour is ill Which severs those it should unite : Let us remain together still, Then it •will be good night. How can I call the lone night good, Though thy sweet wishes wing its flight? Be it not said, thought, understood, Then it will be good night.
Page 328 - Twixt soul and body a divorce, It could not sunder man and wife, 'Cause they both lived but one life. Peace, good reader, do not weep. Peace, the lovers are asleep. They, sweet turtles, folded lie In the last knot that love could tie.
Page 312 - I got five bay-leaves and pinned four of them to the four corners of my pillow, and the fifth to the middle ; and then if I dreamt of my sweetheart, Betty said we should be married before the year was out. But to make it more sure, I boiled an egg hard, and took out the yolk, and filled it with salt; and when I went to bed, ate it, shell and all, without speaking or drinking after it.
Page 100 - They are also for the most part farmers to gentlemen, or at the leastwise artificers, and with grazing, frequenting of markets, and keeping of servants (not idle servants, as the gentlemen do, but such as get both their own and part of their master's living), do come to great wealth, insomuch that many of them are able and do buy the lands of unthrifty gentlemen...
Page 169 - Gentleman of three hundred pounds per annum, who commonly appeared in a plain drab or plush coat, large silver buttons, a jockey cap, and rarely without boots. His travels never exceeded the distance of the county town, and that only at assize and session time, or to attend an election. Once a week he commonly dined at the next market town, with the attornies and justices.
Page 535 - Alas ! the love of Women ! it is known To be a lovely and a fearful thing ; For all of theirs upon that die is thrown, And if 't is lost, Life hath no more to bring To them but mockeries of the past alone...
Page 358 - ... he gave, in return, an unworthy triumph to the unworthy, besides deep sorrow to those whose applause, in his cooler moments, he most valued. It was the same with his politics, which on several occasions assumed a tone menacing and contemptuous to the constitution of his country ; while, in fact, Lord Byron was in his own heart sufficiently sensible, not only of his privileges as a Briton, but of the distinction attending his high birth and rank, and was peculiarly sensitive of those shades which...
Page 55 - ... is not mere verbiage, but has a great deal of acuteness and meaning in it, which you would be glad to pick out if you could. In short, Mr. Bentham writes as if he was allowed but a single sentence to express his whole view of a subject in, and as if, should he...
Page 359 - Harold, nor any of the most beautiful of Byron's earlier tales , contain more exquisite morsels of poetry than are to be found scattered through the cantos of Don Juan...

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