Archaeology and Modernity

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Psychology Press, 2004 - History - 275 pages
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This is the first book-length study to explore the relationship between archaeology and modern thought, showing how philosophical ideas that developed in the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries still dominate our approach to the material remains of ancient societies.

Addressing current debates from a new viewpoint, Archaeology and Modernity discusses the modern emphasis on method rather than ethics or meaning, our understanding of change in history and nature, the role of the nation-state in forming our views of the past, and contemporary notions of human individuality, the mind, and materiality.

 

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Contents

The emergence of modernity and the constitution of archaeology
1
Archaeology and the tensions of modernity
35
The tyranny of method
55
History and nature
78
Nationstates
96
Humanism and the individual
119
Depths and surfaces
149
Mind perception and knowledge
171
Materialities
202
Difference ethics dialogue finitude
223
Bibliography
249
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About the author (2004)

Julian Thomas is Director of the Swinburne Institute for Social Research and Professor of Media and Communications at Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.

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