Vagueness in Law

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2000 - History - 213 pages
"These claims have consequences that have seemed unacceptable to many legal theorists. Because law is vague, judges cannot always decide cases by giving effect to the legal rights and obligations of the parties. Judges cannot always treat like cases alike. The ideal of the rule of law seems to be unattainable. The book offers a new articulation of the content of that ideal. It argues that the pursuit of justice and the rule of law do not depend on the idea that the requirements of the law are determinate in all cases. The resolution of unresolved disputes is an important and independent duty of judges - a duty that is itself an essential component of the ideal of the rule of law."--BOOK JACKET.

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About the author (2000)


Timothy Endicott is Fellow in Law at Balliol College, Oxford

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