Knowledge, Language and Logic: Questions for Quine

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A. Orenstein, P. Kotatko
Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 30, 2000 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 435 pages
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Quine is one of the twentieth century's most important and influential philosophers. The essays in this collection are by some of the leading figures in their fields and they touch on the most recent turnings in Quine's work. The book also features an essay by Quine himself, and his replies to each of the papers. Questions are raised concerning Quine's views on knowledge: observation, holism, truth, naturalized epistemology; about language: meaning, the indeterminacy of translation, conjecture; and about the philosophy of logic: ontology, singular terms, vagueness, identity, and intensional contexts. Given Quine's preeminent position, this book must be of interest to students of philosophy in general, Quine aficionados, and most particularly to those working in the areas of epistemology, ontology, philosophies of language, of logic, and of science.
 

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Contents

an Epistemological Triangle
1
Quine and Davidson on Perceptual Knowledge
7
Quine and Observation
21
Naturalistic Assumptions
47
Justification Coherence and Quine
57
Quine Empiricism and Truth
63
Quine Wittgenstein and Holism
81
Quining The Apriori
95
Publicness and Indeterminacy
163
Individual and Social in Quines Philosophy of Language
181
Platos Beard Quines Stubble and Ockhams Razor
195
An Exercise in Metaphysical Aesthetics
213
Indefinite Objects of Higher Order
225
On a Milestone of Empiricism
237
Lessons from Quine
347
Opacity and the Attitudes
367

The Epistemology of DecisionMaking Naturalised
109
Four Arguments for the Indeterminacy of Translation
131
Naturalizing Radical Translation
141
On the Existence of Meanings
151
Quines Responses
407
Index of Names
431
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