Overhead: Or, What Harry and Nelly Discovered in the Heavens

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D. Lothrop, 1878 - Astronomy - 246 pages
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Page 1 - What makes the waves in the sea?" "Where does this animal live, and what is the use of that plant?" And if not snubbed and stunted by being told not to ask foolish questions, there is no limit to the intellectual craving of a young child; nor any bounds to the slow, but solid, accretion of knowledge and development of the thinking faculty in this way. To all such questions, answers which are necessarily incomplete...
Page 1 - I conceive the proper course to be somewhat as follows. To begin with, let every child be instructed in those general views of the phenomena of Nature, for which we have no exact English name. The nearest approximation to a name for what I mean, which we possess, is "physical geography.
Page 1 - What is the moon, and why does it shine?" "What is this water, and where does it run?" "What is the wind?" "What makes the waves in the sea?" "Where does this animal live, and what is the use of that plant?" And if not snubbed and stunted by being told not to ask foolish questions, there is no limit to the intellectual craving of a young child; nor any bounds to the slow, but solid, accretion of knowledge and development of the thinking faculty in this way.
Page 159 - For, if the sun and moon are on the same side of the earth, they both pull the same way, and their attractive power is united; if they are on opposite sides...
Page 224 - Manilius informs us: Seven equal stars adorn the greater Bear And teach the Grecian sailors how to steer.
Page 160 - ... the sun and the moon are on the same side of the earth, they are drawing by the force of gravitation in the same line. (See Fig. 103.) At this time the tide is much higher than at those times in the month when the moon is drawing along one line and the sun along another. (See Fig. 104.) At full moon, when the sun is on one side of the earth and the moon on the other, there is also a very high tide. (See be, so as to take advantage of it for entering or leaving ports with shallow harbors.
Page 1 - or " geology " in its etymological sense), that is to say, a general knowledge of the earth, and what is on it, in it, and about it. If any one who has had experience of the ways of young children will call to mind their questions, he will find that so far as they can be put into any scientific category, they come under this head of Erdkunde.
Page 11 - Marlow's, about twentynine years old, who was a teacher in one of the public schools of the city where our story is laid.
Page 47 - When I grow up I mean to be an astronomer, and have a telescope of my own.
Page 232 - It is an imaginary line drawn from the North to the South point of the horizon through the zenith.

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