A History of Chinese Philosophy, Volume 2

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Princeton University Press, 1983 - Philosophy - 816 pages
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Since its original publication in Chinese in the 1930s, this work has been accepted by Chinese scholars as the most important contribution to the study of their country's philosophy. In 1952 the book was published by Princeton University Press in an English translation by the distinguished scholar of Chinese history, Derk Bodde, "the dedicated translator of Fung Yu-lan's huge history of Chinese philosophy" (New York Times Book Review). Available for the first time in paperback, it remains the most complete work on the subject in any language.


Volume I covers the period of the philosophers, from the beginnings to around 100 B.C., a philosophical period as remarkable as that of ancient Greece. Volume II discusses a period lesser known in the West--the period of classical learning, from the second century B.C. to the twentieth century.

 

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Contents

CHAPTER IA GENERAL DISCUSSION OF THE PERIOD OF CLASSICAL LEARNING
1
CHAPTER IITUNG CHUNGSHU AND THE NEW TEXT SCHOOL
7
The Cosmological System of the YinYang School
11
Yinjang Schools Correlations of Elements Seasons Directions
15
Tung Chungshus Position among the Confucianists of the Former Han Dynasty
16
Yuan Heaven the Yin and Yang and the Five Elements
19
The Four Seasons
23
Annual Revolution of the Yin and Yang as Described in
26
CHAPTER VIIIBUDDHISM DURING THE Sui AND TANG
293
Six Other Consciousnesses
312
Discriminating the Emptiness of Matter
342
Embracing the Six Qualities
355
The Three Characters
365
CHAPTER XTHE RISE OF NEOCONFUCIANISM AND ITS BOR
407
Correlations of Eight Trigrams Ten Stems and Monthly
430
CHAPTER XICHOU Trisivi AND SHAO YUNG
434

The Correlation of Man with the Numerical Categories of Heaven
30
Human Nature and the Feelings
32
Individual and Social Ethics
38
Polital and Social Philosophy
46
Visitations and Prodigies
55
Philosophy of History
58
Significance of the Spring and Autumn Annals
71
CHAPTER IIIPROGNOSTICATION TEXTS APOCRYPHA AND NUMEROLOGY DURING THE HAN DYNASTY
88
Numerology
91
Pythagorean Tetraktys and Square and Oblong Numbers
94
The Numbers of the Yin and Yang
96
The Positions of the Eight Trigrams
102
The Hexagrams and the Breaths of the Year
106
Meng Hsi and Ching Fang
109
Table of Hexagrams and Seventytwo Periods of the Year
114
The Hexagrams and Music
118
Other Apocrypha
124
The YinYang School and Science
131
CHAPTER IVTHE OLD TEXT SCHOOL AND YANG HSIUNG AND WANG CHUNG
133
CHAPTER VNEOTAOISM DURING THE PERIOD OF DISUNITY
168
CHAPTER VINEOTAOISM DURING THE PERIOD OF DISUNITY
205
CHAPTER VIIBUDDHISM AND ITS CRITICS DURING
237
Diagram of the Supreme Ultimate
436
Diagram of the Supreme Ultimate Explained
443
Diagram of Cosmic Evolution in Terms of the Eight Trigrams
455
Diagram of What Antedates Heaven and Other
459
Circular Diagram of the Sixtyfour Hexagrams
462
Table of Cosmic Chronology
471
CHAPTER XIICHANG TSAI AND THE CHENG BROTHERS
477
Cheng Hao and Cheng Yi
498
Fluctuations of the Yin and Yang and of Good
518
Cheng Yis Theory of Spiritual Cultivation
527
CHAPTER XIIICHU Hsi
533
CHAPTER XIVLu CHIUYUAN WANG SHOUJEN AND MING
572
Unity of Activity and Quiescence
618
CHAPTER XVTHE CHING CONTINUATION OF NEOCON
630
Yen Yiians Diagram of Cosmology
637
Tai Chen
651
CHAPTER XVITHE NEW TEXT SCHOOL OF THE CHING
673
LiaoPing
705
Table of Progress and Retrogression as Found in the Sacred
714
APPENDIXCHRONOLOGICAL TABLE OF THE PERIOD OF CLAS
722
INDEX
755
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About the author (1983)

Dr. Fung Yu-lan is generally recognized as China's leading historian of Chinese philosophy.