The Anatomy of Melancholy: What it Is, with All the Kinds, Causes, Symptomes, Prognostics, and Several Cures of it : in Three Partitions. With Yheir Several Sections, Members, and Subsections, Philosophically, Medicinally, Historically Opened and Cut Up

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B. Blake, 1838 - Melancholy - 743 pages
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Page 40 - Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil ; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness ; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter! Woe unto them that are wise in their own eyes, and prudent in their own sight!
Page 106 - ... sum, intelligible even to the meanest capacity; and that is, Do not that to another, which thou wouldest not have done to thyself...
Page 12 - So that as a river runs sometimes precipitate and swift, then dull and slow ; now direct, then per ambages ; now deep, then shallow ; now muddy, then clear ; now broad, then narrow ; doth my style flow : now serious, then light ; now comical, then satirical ; now more elaborate, then remiss, as the present subject required, or as at that time I was affected.
Page 497 - Tantalus' gold, described by Homer, no substance but mere illusions. When she saw herself descried, she wept, and desired Apollonius to be silent, but he would not be moved, and thereupon she, plate, house, and all that was in it, vanished in an instant : many thousands took notice of this fact, for it was done in the midst of Greece.
Page 2 - Thrace, and was sent for thither to be their law-maker, recorder, or town-clerk, as some will ; or as others, he was there bred and born. Howsoever it was, there he lived at last in a garden in the suburbs, wholly betaking himself to his studies and a private life, " saving that sometimes he would walk down to the haven, v and laugh heartily at such variety of ridiculous objects, which there he saw.
Page 343 - Because hawking and hunting are very laborious, much riding and many dangers accompany them; but this is still and quiet: and if so be the angler catch no Fish, yet he hath a wholesome walk to the...
Page 89 - Donat. ab Altomari saith, that he saw two of them in his time: Wierus tells a story of such a one at Padua, 1541, that would not believe to the contrary, but that he was a wolf.
Page 497 - Phoenician by birth, and if he would tarry with her, he should hear her sing and play, and drink such wine as never any drank, and no man should molest him; but she, being fair and lovely, would live and die with him, that was fair and lovely to behold. The young man, a philosopher, otherwise staid and discreet, able to moderate his passions, though not this of love, tarried with her...
Page 3 - I hear new news every day, and those ordinary rumours of war, plagues, fires, inundations, thefts, murders, massacres, meteors, comets, spectrums, prodigies, apparitions, of towns taken, cities besieged in France, Germany, Turkey, Persia, Poland...

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