The Importance of Being Lazy: In Praise of Play, Leisure, and Vacations

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Taylor & Francis, 2006 - Philosophy - 182 pages
The great American fantasy is about leisure: wooded getaways, Caribbean cruises, white-water rafting, thelights of Las Vegas. Yet one in four Americans does not take a vacation at all. We know how to work hard but not how to play. br br What we really need, argues Al Gini, is some time off. i The Importance of Being Lazy /i takes us on family road trips, to Disneyland, on shopping sprees, on extreme sports adventures, and into the ultimate vacation - retirement -- showing why we venerate vacations and why "doing nothing" is a fundamental human necessity. br br In a witty, breezy tour of our workaholic society, where the summer at the seashore has been supplanted by the long weekend, Gini draws on studies of Americans' vacation habits as well as interviews, personal stories, and the wry observations of philosophers, writers, and sociologists from Aristotle to Mark Twain to Thorstein Veblen. br br Without true leisure, Gini says, we are diminished as individuals and as a society. i The Importance of being Lazy /i is our road map for learning how to play, doze, gaze, amble, and goof-off without guilt.
 

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I found this book entertaining, especially on a day that I was being lazy and surfing the internet.

Contents

The Project and the Problem
1
The Other Side of Leisure WORK DAMN IT
13
Leisure and Culture THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING LAZY
27
Vacations and Traveling
43
Minivacations THE WEEKEND
65
as Leisure and Play
81
Sports and Play
101
The Ultimate Vacation RETIREMENT
117
Sabbath as Metaphor
143
Notes
163
About the Author
175
Index
177
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Al Gini is a Philosophy Professor at Loyola University Chicago and a member of Loyola's Institute of Human Resources and Industrial Relations. He is the co-founder and Associate Editor of the journal Business EthicsQuarterly and the author of Why IT's Hard to BeGood(Routledge).

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