Plutarch's Lives,: Translated from the Original Greek, with Notes Critical and Historical, and a New Life of Plutarch, Volume 1

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Edward and Charles Dilly, 1770 - Greece
 

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Page xlii - Plutarch, to thy deathless praise Does martial Rome this grateful statue raise ; Because both Greece and she thy fame have shared ; Their heroes written, and their lives compared. But thou thyself couldst never write thy own : Their lives have parallels, but thine has none.
Page xxvii - ... from the living fountain. A good man will take care of his horses and dogs, not only while they are young, but when old and past service.
Page 162 - During the first hundred and seventy years they built temples, indeed, and other sacred domes, but placed in them no figure of any kind, persuaded that it is impious to represent things divine by what is perishable, and that we can have no conception of God but by the understanding.
Page 122 - ... which is a deep cavern near the mountain Taygetus; concluding that its life could be no advantage either to itself or to the public, since nature had not given it at first any strength or goodness of constitution.
Page 111 - Who would steal or take a bribe, who would defraud or rob, when he could not conceal the booty ; when he could neither be dignified by the possession of it, nor if cut in pieces be served by its use?
Page 123 - Lycurgus ordered them to be enrolled in companies, where they were all kept under the same order and discipline, and had their exercises and recreations in common. He who showed the most conduct and courage amongst them, was made captain of the company. The rest kept their eyes upon him, obeyed his orders, and bore with patience the punishment he inflicted : so that their whole education was an exercise of obedience.
Page 123 - Plato tells us, no better qualified than a common slave. The Spartan children were not in that manner, under tutors purchased or hired with money, nor were the parents at liberty to educate them as they pleased: but as soon as they were seven years old, Lycurgus ordered them to be enrolled in companies, where they were all kept under the same order and discipline, and had their exercises and recreations in common.

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