Hebrew Gospel of Matthew

Front Cover
Mercer University Press, Jul 1, 2005 - Religion - 239 pages
3 Reviews
"The present book is a revised edition of The Hebrew Gospel of Matthew according to a Primitive Hebrew Text (1995) in which the Hebrew text of the Gospel of Matthew as it appeared in Even Bohan is printed, accompanied by an English translation and an expanded and thorough revision of Howard's critical analysis. An important thrust of this new edition is to establish that the Hebrew Matthew of the Even Bohan predates the fourteenth century. It shares many readings with ancient Christian writings, some of which were lost in antiquity only to reappear in modern times. These included Codex Sinaiticus, the Old Syriac version, the Coptic Gospel of Thomas, and a host of others. Howard also analyzes the language, artistic touches, and theology of the Hebrew Gospel. Perhaps most significant are the portraits of Jesus Christ and John the Baptist depicted in the document. Both portraits belong to an early form of Jewish Christianity -- lost in antiquity -- in which the Baptist plays a salvific role in the redemption of humanity and Jesus operates as a divine solicitor and judge." -- Back cover.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

When scribes overlooked and translated the Gospel according to Matthew many mistranslations still remain because they rewrote from the Greek into refreshed material and kept the mistakes so it lacks, but still it needs to be translated from some older book.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I have studied this scholarly book from cover to cover and believe the translator, Professor George Howard is correct in his beliefs and findings that the Gospel of Matthew was most likely first written in Hebrew rather than Greek or even Aramaic. There are a lot of interesting differences between this Matthew than the ones from the Greek and Aramaic. I especially like his Hebrew and English translation of Matthew 28:19 which agrees with the baptismal methods of the disciples in Acts of the Apostles rather than the Trinitarian formula invented by early Church fathers of the third or fourth centuries. A Coptic manuscript also supports the Shem Tob Version of this verse of only two words in the Hebrew with a possible reading of Go to them. See Budge, E. A. Wallis. Coptic Texts, Volume V: Miscellaneous Coptic Texts in the Dialect of Upper Egypt. London: British Museum, 1915, p. 637.
It would be nice to have someone run the Code Finder program on the Hebrew Text of this version to see whether there seems to be as much inspiration in it as Rev. Glenn David Bauscher has found in his Aramaic version of the Gospel of Mathew.
 

Selected pages

Contents

The Hebrew Text and English Translation
2
Analysis and Commentary
153
ShemTobs Matthew and the HebrewAramaicMatthean Tradition
155
Du Tillet Mūnster and Allusions to and Quotations from Matthew in Early Jewish and AntiChristian Writings
160
The Evidence from ShemTobs Comments
173
A Literary Textual and Theological Profile
177
The Verb
179
Pronouns
180
ShemTob and the Other Gospels
196
ShemTob and the Coptic Gospel of Thomas
203
ShemTob and the PseudoClementine Writings
205
ShemTob and the Toldoth Yeshu
206
ShemTob and the Protevangelium of James
211
Theological Motifs in ShemTobs Matthew
212
The Gentiles
214
The Christ
216

Vocabulary
181
Other Constructions
182
Literary Characteristics of the Hebrew Text
184
Word Connections
185
Alliteration
190
ShemTob and Codex Sinaiticus
191
ShemTob and the Short Ending of Matthew
192
ShemTob the Old Syriac and the Old Latin
194
John the Baptist
218
Different Meanings in ShemTobs Matthew
223
The Divine Name
229
Other Interesting Readings in ShemTobs Matthew
232
Summary and Conclusion
233
Indexes
235
Authors
237
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Bibliographic information