Mr Noon

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, May 21, 1987 - Fiction - 420 pages
Mr Noon is a sardonic tale about the amorous adventures of Gilbert Noon, a young schoolmaster in Lawrence's home county of Nottinghamshire who gets entangled with a girl, loses his job, and decides to leave the country to escape the narrow provincial middle-class morality. It was first known as a long story posthumously published in A Modern Lover (1934) and collected in the volume called Phoenix II (1968). Lawrence in fact wrote a long continuation of the novel, but the manuscript disappeared for many years. The Cambridge edition brought the two parts together for the first time. It is like a sequel to Sons and Lovers, but much more straightforwardly autobiographical. The publication of the complete work added a new work of major importance to the canon of a great writer, and was widely hailed as a major literary event.
 

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User Review  - ivanfranko - LibraryThing

Unfinished novel. Part one deals with disruptions to a love affair with a young woman in a Nottinghamshire colliery town setting. There is conflict with English ideas of decency. Part Two; hero meets ... Read full review

Mr Noon

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Mr. Noon adds a new (though unfinished) novel to the D.H. Lawrence canon. He worked on it in 1920 and 1921, the period immediately following Women in Love and The Lost Girl. The first part, published ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

General editors preface
vii
Acknowledgements
ix
Chronology
x
Cuetitles
xv
Introduction
xix
The composition of Mr Noon
xx
Part I a little book all to itself
xxvi
finishing Mr Noon II
xxix
Basetexts and sources
xxxviii
Sources
xxxix
Explanatory notes
293
Textual apparatus
335
Maps
365
1 Eastwood area 1912
367
2 Rhineland 1912
368
3 Tyrol 1912
369

Publication
xxxiv
Reception
xxxvi
A note on pounds shillings and pence
370
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda, who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.

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