Professional Papers by the Corps of Royal Engineers ... Royal Engineers Institute: Occasional papers, Volume 13

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Page 161 - I beheld there two pettie forts or redoubts, each of them with three ports, and they cannoned, stand within an intrenched closure, having five " courts du guard,
Page 180 - ... to be the intention of the rebels rather to starve than storm the house, the sallies were resumed with a desperate energy ; and the enemy now found it necessary to double their guard. " In the parke side," writes the annalist of the siege, " their lines advanced to our platformes, and their work by the wood forwarded; liberally bestowing great shot, stones, and granades, of which they send us of three severall sortes, besides their hand granades.
Page 138 - ... sergeants that attended the service of the ladders to have 20s. a man : each musketeer that followed the ladder to carry a fagot, a sergeant to command them, and to have the same reward ; 12 files of men with firearms and...
Page 202 - Favelure, of the then existing defences of the town, made probably for the guidance of De Gomme in his project for remodelling the fortifications. It is probable that the works here represented include the old enciente of Henry VIII. and Elizabeth's time, as well as the works, to carry out which Rudd was sent down shortly before the beginning of the Civil War. This collection of plans and documents (Add. MSS. 16370 and 16371) were purchased by the British Museum at the sale of the library of Mr....
Page 161 - ... chains of yron, and all the opening passages at street ends, for the fields and road wayes are in like manner strictly watched. The sides of the river as at Billingsgate and other places have also courts on guard and they nightly guarded with companies of the trained band. . .twelve thousand in all. Beyond the river in the Borough of Southwark is the selfsame discipline observed and all under the command of the Citie. So is Westminster, the Strand and all the Liberties there now taken in under...
Page 177 - ... Sabbath) doubling their diligence throughout the Leaguer, forwarding the Sconce at Morleye's Quarters in the Parke, and on the Towne side towards a 96 Mill, drawing a Line from the Church. At Onslowe's Quarter, raising a platforme in the Lane with so much speed, that the next morning a Deray-Culverin playes from it; at night our Messenger from Oxford informing us His Majesties successe against Waller and Cropready. We Ecchoe it to our neighbours with Volleys, both of small and great, they answering...
Page 205 - BASING HOUSE. Plan reduced from the ordnance survey map to illustrate the journal of the siege given in the Appendix ( C). The works shown on the ordnance map have been personally inspected, and are accurately shown on that map. No. XIV.— COLCHESTER. From a contemporary broadside (not to scale) with title " The Siege of Colchester, By the Lord Fairfax, as it was with the line and outworks, 1648.
Page 150 - the works and fortifications also did now go on apace, and those in St. Clement's Parish, on the east side of Oxford, were about this time begun, which, with other fortifications about the city, were mostly contrived by one Richard Rallingson, Bachelor of Arts of Queen's College, who had also drawn a mathematical scheme or plot of the garrison. His endeavours in this nature gave so great satisfaction to the King, that he forthwith sent letters in his behalf to the University to confer the Degree...
Page 150 - April 19, 1643, when a proclamation was issued for the collecting of arms and material of war, swords, corslets, head-pieces, &c., to the end that the University and city might be better defended on the king's going to Reading with his army, which he suddenly intended to do. The works and fortifications, also, did now go on apace, and those in St. Clement's parish, on the east side of Oxford, were about this time begun, which, with other fortifications about the city, were mostly contrived by one...
Page 191 - ... were to villify the enemy ; blaming his valor or discretion, or yet to say the care and diligence of the Lord Marquise Governour, the skill and valour of the Officers, the courage and obedience of the souldiers (though all these did their parts) had thus preserved the place, in vain we watch and ward, except God keepe the House. Let no man therefore speake himselfe an instrument, onely in giving thankes that God had made him so, for here was evidently seen He chose the weake to confound tlu.

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