History of the Persecutions Endured by the Protestants of the South of France: And More Especially of the Department of the Gard, During the Years 1814, 1815, 1816, &c. : Including a Defence of Their Conduct, from the Revolution to the Present Period, Volume 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Brown, 1821 - Persecution
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Page 564 - Lead me in Thy truth, and teach me : For Thou art the God of my salvation ; On Thee do I wait all the day.
Page 554 - Gilly knew better than to appear before them, and was condemned to death for contempt of court. But when he left Nismes, he thought either of passing into a foreign country, or of joining the army of the Loire; and it was long supposed that he had actually escaped. As it was impossible to gain any point, or find any security, his only hope was in concealment, and a friend found him an asylum in the cottage of a peasant; but that peasant was a protestant, and the general was a catholic: however, he...
Page 555 - Bresse, the mayor, at 24*00 francs ; and General Gilly at 10,000 !" " Is it possible ?" " Aye, it is certain." Gilly concealed his emotion ; a momentary suspicion passed his mind ; he appeared to reflect.
Page 529 - w.' To Generals Bacellar and Trant. ' GENTLEMEN, ' Freneda, 5th March, 1812. ' The Captain General Castanos will pass through Lamego and Oporto, on his way to Juiz in Galicia, in a short time. I request you to pay him every attention which is due to his high rank and situation, and to the important services which he has rendered to the cause of the allied Governments. I beg you to recommend the General to the attention of the military governors and civil magistrates through whose districts and towns...
Page 482 - at the bottom of the pulpit, with my daughter in my arms; my husband at length joined and sustained me; I remembered that it was the anniversary of my marriage; after six years of happiness, I said, I am about to die with my husband and my daughter; we shall be slain at the altar of our God, the victims of a sacred duty, and heaven will open to receive us and our unhappy brethren. I blessed the Redeemer, and without cursing our murderers, I awaited their approach.
Page 596 - Ultimate resolution of the Protestants at Nismes. With respect to the conduct of the protestants, these highly outraged citizens, pushed to extremities by their persecutors, felt at length that they had only to choose the manner in which they were to perish. They unanimously determined that they would die fighting in their own defence. This firm attitude apprised their butchers that they could no longer murder with impunity. Every thing was immediately changed.
Page 555 - Why do you complain ? you are fortunate, compared with the wretches whose heads were cried in the market ; Bruguier, the pastor, at 2400 ; Bresse, the mayor, at 2400 francs ; and General Gilly at 10,000 !" " Is it possible !"
Page 554 - ... condemned to death on the charge of contumacy. When the General quitted Nismes, he thought either of passing into a foreign country, or of joining the army of the Loire, and it was long supposed that he had actually escaped. But it was impossible to gain any point, or find any security ; his only hope was in concealment. The attempt was desperate ; a friend found him an asylum in the cottage of a peasant, but that peasant was a protestant, and the General was a catholic. " The step," said his...
Page 542 - Londonderry brought forward his motion on our foreign relations, and moved that an humble address be presented to his Majesty, praying that he would be graciously pleased to give directions that there be laid before...
Page 555 - ... Patrols were continually searching for arms in the houses of protestants; and often in the night the general was obliged to leave his mattress, half naked, and hide himself in the fields. Perrier, to avoid these . inconveniences, made an under-ground passage, by which his guest could pass to an outhouse. The wife of Perrier could not endure that one who had seen better days should live as her family did, on vegetables and bread, and occasionally bought meat to regale the melancholy stranger.

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