The Haitian Creole Language: History, Structure, Use, and Education

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Arthur K. Spears, Carole M. Berotte Joseph
Lexington Books, 2012 - Education - 320 pages
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"This Book Could Not Be More Timely, When So Many Observers Worldwide Are Analyzing Haiti As They Assist In The Rebuilding Of This Long-Beleaguered Nation. As It Turns Out, One Of The Fundamental Impediments In Building A Better Haiti For All Has Long Been A Thorough Misuse Of Language In Its Education System: French Is Still Used As The Major Language Of Instruction Even Though It Is, In Effect, A Foreign Language For The Majority Of Haitians. These Chapters Will Instill Better Knowledge And Respect Of Haiti And Haitian Creole And Will Promote Haiti's National Language Both As An Indispensable Language Of Instruction At All Levels Of Haiti's Education System And As An Important Topic Of Research In Haiti And Beyond. Such Promotion Of Haitian Creole Will Contribute To The Socioeconomic Betterment Of Monolingual Haitian Creole Speakersùthe Vast Majority Of Haitians In Haiti. Altogether The Contributors To This Anthology Are To Be Commended For Their Exemplary Use Of Scholarship Toward Progressive Social Change. The Book's Lucid Analyses Of The Impact Of Neocolonial Ideology On Language Policy Arc Also Relevant To Language-Related Social Struggles Outside Of Haiti (Witness, Say, The 'Ebonies' Debate In The United States)."ùMichel Degraff, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology.
 

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Contents

The Haitian Creole Language
1
History
21
Structure and Use
81
Education
175
List of Contributors
283
Index
287
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Arthur K. Spears is Professor of Linguistics and Anthropology at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (CUNY). He is also Chair of the Anthropology Department and Director of Black Studies at The City College, CUNY. Dr. Spears's research is in the areas of African American English; pidgin and creole languages, focusing on Haitian and other French-lexifier creoles; language and education; race and ideology; and controversial words. In addition to being the founder and first editor of Transforming Anthropology, the journal of the Association of Black Anthropologists, he is the former president of the Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics, an international body devoted to the study of language contact worldwide.

Carole M. Berotte Joseph is the President of The Bronx Community College of The City University of New York. She serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of the New York State Association for Bilingual Education and Wadabagei, a journal dealing with the Caribbean and its diaspora. Born in Haiti, Dr. Berotte Joseph has lectured exten¬sively on educational policy issues facing Haitian com¬munities in the United States and in Haiti.

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