To Have and to Hold: Marrying and its Documentation in Western Christendom, 400–1600

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Philip L. Reynolds, John Witte
Cambridge University Press, Feb 5, 2007 - History
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This 2007 book analyzes how, why, and when pre-modern Europeans documented their marriages - through property deeds, marital settlements, dotal charters, church court depositions, wedding liturgies, and other indicia of marital consent. The authors consider both the function of documentation in the process of marrying and what the surviving documents say about pre-modern marriage and how people in the day understood it. Drawing on archival evidence from classical Rome, medieval France, England, Iceland, and Ireland, and Renaissance Florence, Douai, and Geneva, the volume provides a rich interdisciplinary analysis of the range of marital customs, laws, and practices in Western Christendom. The chapters include freshly translated specimen documents that bring the reader closer to the actual practice of marrying than the normative literature of pre-modern theology and canon law.
 

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Contents

chapter one
1
chapter two
43
CHAPTER THREE
95
had begun to adopt Christianized marriage rituals prior to the
97
contract? For the sake of procreating children The fathers brow
108
read out to them they should reckon them to be
110
Conclusion
112
chapter four
114
Finally it is worth noting that it is the mother
231
new education of scribes in Roman law traditions Because there
233
Ademars heirs these guarantors were to go to Montpellier and
235
Attention to the sociopolitical context of the marriage agreement may
239
and her brothers belonged had connections with the cathedral chapter
247
Seven Marriage Agreements
249
and is near the gate that is called dObilion and
250
chapter seven
260

the husbands gift in postCarolingian northernFrench sources may have been
118
lines where the disposition should be In Extr I 13
142
The Dotal Formulae in Zeumers Collection
148
Formulae Bituricenses
152
for such isrequiredbothbythe manor andbythemunicipal rolls12 Therefore
153
CHAPTER FIVE
165
or less direct inspiration of the formula of Charters 1
181
that it shows the relative strength of the contracting parties
182
a sociopolitical sense must be added the personal position of
186
Sign of Guillaume de Sissonne5 Sign of Foulque dEcry6 Sign
198
to the branches from which the daughters of Itier and
201
brother38 Raoul Revel39 Guillaume Senis40 Robert my stepfather41 Gerard
204
Ferietate La FerteChevresis?66 who appears between 1163 and 1190 in
209
Sign of Hugues de Pierrepont1 Signs of Aubri de Bosmont72
211
look for the places to which both husband and wife
213
CHAPTER SIX
215
Our chief evidence regarding the practice of getting married in
216
and complete either canonically or socially All we can say
229
texts from middle to lower social groups to complement work
230
entering into a marriage at the time the contract was
264
Selected English Marriage Contracts
274
chapter eight
287
Asked about the persons present at the said matrimonial contract
327
chapter nine
332
Depositions from the Armagh Registers
351
chapter ten
360
whereby a womans guardian gave her away93 This new meaning
380
Four Icelandic Marriage Contracts
385
chapter eleven
390
Florentine Marriage Documents
411
chapter twelve
421
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
453
Betrothal and Marriage Contracts
456
Marital Property
464
forth between the Consistory and Council for more than a
473
lowest value the said Claude shall promise
478
On March 23 the Council summoned them for the following
487

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Page 9 - Wherefore a man shall leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife : and they shall be two in one flesh.

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