Invisible Light: Poems about God

Front Cover
Diana Culbertson
Columbia University Press, 2000 - Poetry - 174 pages
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FOR THE FIRST TIME GOD is the subject of a poetry anthology in English. Among the classic poets represented in this collection are Donne, Herbert, Milton, Blake, Emerson, E. B. Browning, Tennyson, Dickinson, and Hopkins; among the twentieth-century poets, Thomas Hardy, D. H. Lawrence, Countee Cullen, Jessica Powers, John Berryman, Robert Lowell, Denise Levertov, Anne Sexton, Alicia Ostriker, and Kathleen Norris. From the chorus of these many poetic voices come stunning words, images, and insights -- from Paul Murray's depiction of "that needle's eye / through which all the threads / of the universe are drawn" to Gwendolyn Brooks's touching rumination on God as someone lonely, who "tires of being great / In solitude. Without a hand to hold".

Invisible Light is focused on God in the three largest monotheistic religions -- Judaism, Christianity, and Islam -- and is divided into three sections: "From God" (in God's voice, in the first person), "To God" (generally prayers, addressed to God, in the second person), and "About God" (in the third person).

Witty, passionate, melancholic, sanguine, and ecstatic, the poems approach their single subject from the most diverse attitudes and perspectives. "The doubters, believers, lovers and philosophers, the anguished and flippant, submissive and prayerful, speak for us and about us", Diana Culbertson writes. "Through their words, we may possibly see God anew".

 

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Contents

Yfw Saluste Sieur du Bartas from Eden
10
The Island
22
The Knights Prayer
35
A Hymn to God the Father
46
Our God Our Help in Ages Past
59
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Edward D. berkowitz is professor of history and public policy and public administration at George Washington University. He is the author of eight books and the editor of three collections. During the seventies he served as a staff member of the President's Commission for a National Agenda, helping President Carter plan for a second term that never came to be.

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