Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 1, Volumes 1-14

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University of Illinois Press, 1972 - Social Science - 509 pages
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The memoirs and accounts of the Black educator are presented with letters, speeches, personal documents, and other writings reflecting his life and career.
 

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Contents

The Story of My Life and Work 19oo
1
CONTENTS
9
n Boyhood in West Virginia
15
How the First Six Years after Graduation from Hampton
24
vn The Struggles and Success of the Workers at Tuskegee from
36
1x Invited to Deliver a Lecture at Fisk University
61
The Speech at the Opening of the Cotton States Exposition
67
xn Honored by Harvard University
93
n Boyhood Days
226
1n The Struggle for an Education
236
1v Helping Others
247
Up from Slavery 1 9o 1 2 1 1
256
VHI Teaching School in a Stable and a HenHouse
278
Anxious Days and Sleepless Nights
286
A Harder Task than Making Bricks without Straw
294
x1 Making Their Beds before They Could Lie on Them
302

x1v The Shaw Monument Speech the Visit of Secretary James
106
Cuban Education and the Chicago Peace Jubilee Address
118
xv1 The Visit of President William McKinley to Tuskegee
127
x1x The West Virginia and Other Receptions after European
155
The Movement for a Permanent Endowment
164
xx1 A Description of the Work of the Tuskegee Institute
172
Origin and Work
180
xxm Looking Backward
195
CONTENTS
215
xn Raising Money
309
xra Two Thousand Miles for a FiveMinute Speech
319
The Secret of Success in Public Speaking
341
xvn Last Words
371
A LETTER TO THE EDITORS OF THE Southern Workman
389
AN EXTRACT FROM THE PRIVILEGE OF SERVICE
398
INDEX
459
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About the author (1972)

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) was born a slave. He graduated from what is today Hampton University in 1875, and subsequently taught there. In 1881 he founded the forerunner of Tuskegee University. He made himself and his school two of the most well-known institutions in twentieth-century black America. He earned world-renowned recognition as an educator, social theorist, and spokesperson for African Americans.

Harlan is Professor of History at the University of Maryland.

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