Modern Intellectual Property Law

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2005 - Law - 738 pages
0 Reviews

Intellectual property law's influence extends to every aspect of human life. The markings on a can of Coca-cola, the rights in the books, music, pictures, drama, films and electronic information sources we all use, even the shape of our pen, architecture and the science behind the latest attempt on space exploration all form its subject matter. This popular text explains and examines the often complicated law which protects and preserves new ideas and outlines how intellectual property rights allow right owners to stop others taking their creations.


The changes in the new edition reflect this rapidly expanding field. This textbook includes:



  • amendments to major decisions from the House of Lords and the European Court of Justice

  • recent legislation such as the Patents Act 2004

  • the effect of developments in information technology on copyright and patent principles

  • recent case law including Kirin-Amgen Inc v Hoechst Marion Roussel Ltdand British Horseracing Board Ltd v William Hill Organization

  • the impact of UK, EC and EU competition laws on intellectual property rights

  • a new chapter devoted to protection for image

  • new coverage relating to domain names

  • an examination of the increasing attention to human rights in intellectual property law.

This thoughtful and thought-provoking text is essential reading for any student of intellectual property law. With further reading at the end of each chapter, it is the ideal introduction to a thorough understanding of intellectual property law.


 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
11 Protection for ideas
2
13 Sources of intellectual property law
6
14 Intellectual property rights free movement and competition
11
15 Competition policy of the EC and UK
18
16 Other impacts of EU law on national intellectual property laws
25
18 Harmonisation directives and communitywide rights
28
JUSTIFICATION
31
113 Incidental inclusion
366
114 Home copying
367
115 The internet
369
116 News and media
372
117 Educational copying and libraries
373
118 Computer programs
374
119 Other permitted acts
375
1110 Copyright Visually Impaired Persons Act 2002
376

21 The nature of exclusive rights
32
unfair competition
37
23 Justifications
40
24 Justifications for patents
43
25 Justifications for copyright
48
26 Trade marks
51
THE PATENT
57
32 Patent terminology
62
33 Patents Act 1977
63
34 Application for a Patent
64
35 Ownership of the Patent
70
36 The compensation scheme
74
37 The proprietary right
79
39 Patents and UK competition law
81
310 Patents and the Community competition rules
83
311 The application of Article 811 to licences of intellectual property rights
84
312 he application of Article 811 to licences
85
313 Block exemption regulations
87
314 Block Exemption Regulation 24096
88
315 Review of the Technology Transfer Regulation
90
316 The new Technology Transfer Block Exemption 7722004
91
317 Individual assessment under Article 813
96
319 Trade mark licences and the new TTBE
97
320 Licensing and other horizontal intellectual property agreements
98
321 Article 82 of the EC Treaty and Licence Agreements
99
PATENTABLE SUBJECT MATTER
109
42 Excluded categories
112
43 Computer Programs
114
44 Discoveries and mathematical methods
120
45 Schemes rules and methods
123
46 Presentations of information
126
48 Exclusions on the ground of morality and public policy
127
49 Biological inventions
133
410 Medical inventions
141
PATENTABLE INVENTIONS
151
52 Inventive step
166
53 Industrial application
174
54 Disclosure
175
INFRINGEMENT VALIDITY AND REVOCATION
181
62 Infringing acts
191
63 Defences
197
64 Revocation and opposition
201
65 Nonbonding opinions as to validity by the Patent Office
202
BREACH OF CONFIDENCE
205
72 Development of the action
207
74 Information
208
75 Confidentiality of information
213
76 Residual confidentiality in published information
217
77 The obligation of confidence
221
78 The direct recipientexpress obligations
222
79 The indirect recipient
229
710 No relationship
232
711 Breach
235
712 Defences
239
714 Remedies
243
COPYRIGHT PRINCIPLES COPYRIGHT WORKS AND RELATED RIGHTS
249
82 Basic principles
255
83 Copyright works
260
84 Original works
261
85 Literary works
266
86 Dramatic works
269
87 Musical works
271
88 Artistic works
272
89 Derivative works
277
810 Related rights
281
811 Unoriginal databases
282
812 Rights for performers in performances
288
THE SUBSISTENCE AND SUBSTANCE OF COPYRIGHT AND RELATED RIGHTS
295
92 Authorship
298
93 Ownership of copyright
303
94 Duration of copyright
308
95 Refusal of copyright
311
96 The exclusive rights
312
97 Droit de Suite
318
INFRINGEMENT OF COPYRIGHT AND DEFENCES
321
102 Authorsing infringement
332
103 Infringement of secondary works
340
105 Protection for technological measures
343
106 Protection for electronic rights management
347
108 Defences
349
EMPLOYING COPYRIGHT PERMITTED COPYRIGHT USES DEALINGS IN WORKS AND COMPETITION
357
112 Fair Dealing
358
1112 Collective licensing and the Copyright Tribunal
379
1113 UK competition policy
380
1114 The Copyright Tribunal
381
1115 EU law
382
MORAL RIGHTS
387
122 The UK before the CDPA 1988
389
123 The CDPA 1988
392
124 The right of paternity
393
125 Right of integrity
396
126 The right against false attribution
400
127 The right to privacy
401
128 Waiver of rights
402
129 Commentary
403
DESIGN RIGHTS
407
132 Copyright and design
411
133 UK registered design right
416
134 The old law
418
135 The new law
426
136 UK unregistered design right
441
137 Community designs
454
138 Registered community design
458
139 Unregistered community design right
462
PASSING OFF
465
142 The development and definition of passing off
466
143 Reputation
471
144 Goodwill
473
145 Coincidence of reputation and goodwill
475
146 Misrepresentation
481
147 Damage
493
148 Lookalike products
498
REGISTERED TRADE MARKS
501
152 Registration of a mark
509
153 The definition of a trade mark
514
154 The absolute grounds of refusal
525
155 Not a trade mark
528
156 Nondistinctive signs
529
157 Descriptive marks
534
158 Customary marks
540
1510 Shapes
543
1511 Objectionable and deceptive marks
547
1512 Prohibited marks
550
1515 The relative grounds of refusal
554
1516 The comparison
556
1517 Raising the relative grounds of refusal
558
TRADE MARK INFRINGEMENT AND CHALLENGES TO TRADE MARKS
563
162 Infringement
566
163 Identical marksidentical goods or services
570
164 Identical markssimilar goods or services similar marksidentical or similar goods or services
571
165 Identical or similar marksmarks with a reputation
578
166 Comparative advertising
586
167 Well known marks
588
168 Defences to infringement
591
169 Criminal offences
594
1610 Revocation invalidity and acquiescence
595
1611 Threats
602
PROPERTY AND DEALINGS IN MARKS AND DOMAIN NAME DISPUTES
605
173 Merchandising marks
606
174 Exhaustion
608
176 Domain names
615
IMAGE PROTECTION
631
181 Justifications for legal protection
632
182 Passing off and merchandising
636
183 Merchandising and trade marks
639
184 Copyright and merchandising
645
185 Design protection and merchandising
647
186 Protection for personality
648
188 The right to freedom of expression
656
189 The Data Protection Act 1998
660
1810 The Advertising Standards Code
661
ENFORCEMENT
665
192 Proceedings
667
193 Securing evidence
671
194 Search Anton Piller orders
672
195 FreezingMareva injunctions
676
196 Norwich Pharmacal orders
677
198 Damages
679
199 Injunctions or interdicts
683
1910 Threats of proceedings
690
1911 Acquiescence
694
1913 Crossborder disputes
696
Index
703
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Bibliographic information