The History of the Conquest of New Spain

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UNM Press, 2008 - History - 473 pages
7 Reviews

The History of the Conquest of New Spain by Bernal Diaz del Castillo, a new abridgement of Diaz del Castillo's classic Historia verdadera de la conquista de Nueva España, offers a unique contribution to our understanding of the political and religious forces that drove the great cultural encounter between Spain and the Americas known as the "conquest of Mexico." Besides containing important passages, scenes, and events excluded from other abridgements, this edition includes eight useful interpretive essays that address indigenous religions and cultural practices, sexuality during the early colonial period, the roles of women in indigenous cultures, and analysis of the political and economic purposes behind Diaz del Castillo's narrative. A series of maps illuminate the routes of the conquistadors, the organization of indigenous settlements, the struggle for the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan, as well as the disastrous Spanish journey to Honduras. The information compiled for this volume offers increased accessibility to the original text, places it in a wider social and narrative context, and encourages further learning, research, and understanding.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Miro - LibraryThing

Sometimes extraordinary events are fortuitously recorded by a well placed participant. In this case, Bernal Diaz del Castillo, describes the 16th century Spanish discovery and defeat of the Mexican ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kabouter - LibraryThing

Intriguing novel (although it shouldn't be considered fiction), by one of Hernan Cortés' soldiers who tells the tale of the conquest of New-Spain (read: Mexico). If gives an image of the lifes of ... Read full review

Contents

The Expedition under Grijalva
14
The Expedition under Cortés Begins
16
Cortés Attacks the Ceiba Tree
40
Enter Doña Marina
48
Signs of Empire
52
Spaniards Viewed as Gods
64
Cortés Destroys the Ships
84
War in Tlaxcala
90
Indian Allies and Spanish Disasters
276
Dismal Drums and Human Sacrifices
286
The Fall of Mexico and the Surrender of Guatemoc
296
The City as a Wasteland
302
Torturing Guatemoc for Treasure
310
Zapotec Fury
326
Pedro de Alvarado Attacks in Guatemala
328
Turmoil in Chiapas
342

The Spaniards Plea for Peace and Alliance
98
Ambassadors from Montezuma Arrive
110
Baptizing Tlaxcalan Women
118
The Massacre at Cholula
130
The March to Mexico
146
Arrival in the Splendid City of Tenochtitlan
156
Montezuma in Captivity
184
Games with Montezuma
192
Cortés Struggles with Narváez
208
Spanish Massacre of the Dancers
210
Spanish Defeat and the Noche Triste
224
The Return to the Valley and the Alliance with Texcoco
238
The Seige Begins from Texcoco
262
The Arrival of the Twelve Franciscans
354
Mexico City Becomes a Roman Circus
362
Maps
372
Bernal Díaz del Castillo
388
Cortés and the Sacred Ceiba
398
Colonial Sexuality
404
La Malinche as Palimpset
418
The Exaggerations of Human Sacrifice
438
Tenochtitlan as a Pollitical Capital and World Symbol
448
Human SacrificeDebt Payments from the Aztec Point of View
458
Spaniards as Gods
466
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

David Carrasco is Neil L. Rudenstine Professor of the Study of Latin America with a joint appointment in the Department of Anthropology and the Divinity School at Harvard University

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