The Doctors' Plague: Germs, Childbed Fever, and the Strange Story of Ignác Semmelweis

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 2003 - Medical - 191 pages
1 Review
An analysis of nineteenth-century Viennese doctor Ignac Semmelweis's reforms of the medical establishment describes his discovery of the correlation between hand washing and reduced infection, recounting how his early work contributed to the subsequent establishment of germ theory. 30,000 first printing.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

The doctors' plague: germs, childbed fever, and the strange story of IgnĂƒÂˇc Semmelweis

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

At a time when diseases were attributed to "miasmata" or "effluvia," a brilliant young Hungarian doctor deduced why postpartum women's death rates were so staggeringly high even in the best of ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
13
II
31
III
57
IV
73
V
89
VI
111
VII
133
VIII
155
IX
177
X
187
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - Atropos, cuts the thread of life for those to whom Clotho and Lachesis would give the longest span. There is something so touching in the death of a woman who has recently given birth to her child ; something so mournful in the disappointment of cherished hopes ; something so pitiful in the deserted condition of the new-born helpless creature, for ever deprived of those tender cares and caresses that are necessary for it — that the hardest heart is sensible to the catastrophe.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2003)

Sherwin B. Nuland is clinical professor of surgery at Yale University, where he also teaches bioethics and medical history.

Bibliographic information