The Parks, Gardens, Etc., of London and Its Suburbs, Described and Illustrated, for the Guidance of Strangers

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John Weale, 1851 - Parks - 190 pages
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Page 43 - ... feet from the ground), a similar release was needed by the other. The rate of growth then most sensibly diminished ; still, in two months, the flowerstalks had attained a height of 36 feet ! The flowers were innumerable on the great panicles : they produced no seed, but were succeeded by thousands of young plants, springing from the topmost branches, and these continued growing for a long while after the death of the parent plants, both of which perished, apparently from exhaustion.
Page 43 - The two plants in question had been in the Royal Gardens, first of Hampton Court and then of Kew, probably from the earliest introduction of the species into Europe, upwards of a century ago (in 1731). On one and the same day, in the summer of 1844, each was seen to produce a. flowering stem, which resembled a gigantic head of asparagus, and grew at first at the astonishing rate of two feet in the twenty-four hours.
Page 43 - On one and the same day, in the summer of 1844, each was seen to produce a flowering stem, which resembled a gigantic head of asparagus, and grew at first at the astonishing rate of two feet in the twenty-four hours. So precisely did the twin plants keep pace with each other, that at the very time it was found necessary to make an aperture in the glass roof of the house for the emission of one panicle of flowers (twenty-six feet from the ground), a similar release was needed by the other.
Page 73 - An auxiliary boiler is also provided, for giving increased temperature to the water circulating in the pipes, when required. An outer chamber of brickwork is constructed around the furnace-room, from whence also heated air is transmitted to the interior of the house. Additional boiler power is now being added, to compensate for the extra heat required for the stove. Ventilation is provided by means of sashes made to slide on the roof, and worked simultaneously by means of simple machinery ; and at...
Page 67 - ... general, it should in no way be obtruded. And whenever the rougher characteristics of nature are brought into a polished garden, there is just as much necessity for keeping them secluded and by themselves, as there is for isolating the conspicuous evidences of art in one of Nature's wildest scenes. Several platforms on the face of the mound, and especially one at the summit, afford the most beautiful views of Regent's Park and its villas, Primrose and other neighbouring hills, and the more distant...
Page 68 - ... principally to act as divisions to the larger groups of natural orders. These hedges separate the garden into the great natural divisions, and each of the compartments they form is again subdivided into orders by walks four feet in width, the sub-orders being indicated by division-walks of two feet in width. The inquiries of the student are thus greatly aided, and he is enabled to carry away a much clearer impression of the natural system than can be had from books.
Page 45 - ... varied on the surface, so as to take a less flat and more natural character, yet we cannot but point to the practice as a very decided step in the right direction, which we hope ere long to see extended to other departments and houses in these gardens, and executed with spirit. Plants of Lycopodium are growing here and there among the Cacti, and enliven the whole mass considerably; though they will undoubtedly require watching and restraint to prevent them from spreading too far, or producing...
Page 41 - Schomburgk in British Guiana, in 1837. Drawings were afterwards exhibited, and seeds repeatedly brought over ; but as these did not germinate, the idea of a plant with leaves from 5 to 6 feet across, and flowers 15 inches in diameter, began to be reckoned among those travellers' stories which men who go out of the beaten track are supposed to have a peculiar facility in concocting. At length, however, in 1849, Dr. Rodie, of Demerara, sent fresh seeds to the Kew Gardens, and as the plants from these...
Page 115 - Nelumbiums, are grown at the sides and towards the comers of the tank, but are not allowed in any way to interfere with the Victoria. In a back corner of the kitchen garden, adjoining the lane that leads from Brentford through Syon Park, is the large tropical house. This is a lofty structure, with an upright back wall, and a curvilinear iron roof. It has a glass division in the centre, and contains a collection of tropical fruits which is probably quite unique in this country. Many of the plants...
Page 69 - The plan is worthy of imitation in any place where the plants have to stand on the ground, as, by being rendered thus tall, their flowers are brought more on a level with the eye. There were likewise some standard Azaleas here, of the Indian varieties, which are serviceable in a similar way to the Pelargoniums. The new houses are constructed in a very simple manner, with a path down the centre, flat shelves or stages at the sides, the...

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