A History of the University of Pennsylvania: From Its Foundation to A. D. 1770; Including Biographical Sketches of the Trustees, Faculty, the First Alumni and Others, Part 1770

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G. W. Jacobs & Company, 1900 - Pennsylvania. University - 566 pages
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Page 38 - I had never before seen any of them. I bought it, read it over and over, and was much delighted with it. I thought the writing excellent, and wished, if possible, to imitate it. With...
Page 15 - Often I sat up in my room reading the greatest part of the night, when the book was borrowed in the evening and to be returned early in the morning, lest it should be missed or wanted.
Page 30 - To that kind Providence we owe this happy opportunity of consulting in peace on the means of establishing our future national felicity. And have we now forgotten that powerful Friend ? or do we imagine we no longer need his assistance? I have lived, Sir, a long time ; and, the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth, that GOD govern! in the affairs of men.
Page 30 - I firmly believe this ; and I also believe, that without His concurring aid, we shall succeed in this political building no better than the builders of Babel ; we shall be divided by our little partial local interests, our projects will be confounded, and we ourselves shall become a reproach and a by-word down to future ages.
Page 225 - These savages may indeed be a formidable enemy to your raw American militia ; but upon the King's regular and disciplined troops, Sir, it is impossible they should make any impression.
Page 27 - I thought it would have been better to have built the house here, and brought the children to it. This I advised ; but he was resolute in his first project, rejected my counsel, and I therefore refused to contribute. I happened soon after to attend one of his sermons, in the course of which I perceived he intended to finish with a collection, and I silently resolved he should get nothing from me.
Page 37 - As to their studies, it would be well if they could be taught everything that is useful, and everything that is ornamental. But art is long, and their time is short. It is therefore proposed that they learn those things that are likely to be most useful and most ornamental, regard being had to the several professions for which they are intended.
Page 16 - Thus refreshed, I walked again up the street, which by this time had many clean-dressed people in it, who were all walking the same way. I joined them, and thereby was led into the great meetinghouse of the Quakers near the market.
Page 22 - I had begun in 1733 to study languages; I soon made myself so much a master of the French as to be able to read the books with ease.
Page 496 - Delightful task ! to rear the tender thought, To teach the young idea how to shoot, To pour the fresh instruction o'er the mind, To breathe the enlivening spirit, and to fix The generous purpose in the glowing breast.

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