Risk: The Science and Politics of Fear

Front Cover
Ebury Publishing, Sep 4, 2008 - Science - 432 pages
5 Reviews

We are the safest humans who ever lived - the statistics prove it. And yet the media tells a different story with its warnings and scare stories. How is it possible that anxiety has become the stuff of daily life?

In this ground-breaking, compulsively readable book, Dan Gardner shows how our flawed strategies for perceiving risk influence our lives, often with unforeseen and sometimes-tragic consequences. He throws light on our paranoia about everything from paedophiles to terrorism and reveals how the most significant threats are actually the mundane risks to which we pay little attention.

Speaking to psychologists and scientists, as well as looking at the influence of the media and politicians, Gardner uncovers one of the central puzzles of our time: why are the safest people in history living in a culture of fear?

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - vguy - LibraryThing

Kahneman Lite! Talks of Gut and Head, instead of System 1 & 2 so immediately more graphic, more journalistic and less methodical/scientific. Good wide-ranging account of how we are bamboozled by the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Parthurbook - LibraryThing

Two themes run through this excellent book: the tendency of 'Gut' to influence decisions we think we take with our 'Head', and how vested interests use fear for commercial and political ends. Gardner ... Read full review

About the author (2008)

Dan Gardner is a columnist and senior writer for the Ottawa Citizen. Trained in history and law, Gardner worked in politics as a senior policy adviser before turning to journalism. His writing has received numerous awards, including the National Newspaper Award and Amnesty International's Media Award. He lives in Ottawa with his wife and two children.

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