Gentleman's Magazine Library: Bedfordshire. Berkshire. Buckinghamshire

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E. Stock, 1905 - England
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Page 189 - Ocean, the first thing which strikes us is, that, the north-east and south-east monsoons, which are found the one on the north and the other on...
Page 59 - E'en such is man; whose thread is spun, Drawn out, and cut, and so is done. The rose withers, the blossom blasteth; The flower fades, the morning hasteth; The sun sets, the shadow flies; The gourd consumes, — and man he dies...
Page 122 - School ; and the inhabitants of the parish of St. Olave were not slow to follow so enlightened and benevolent a policy. St. Olave's School was set on foot in the year 1560, and constituted 'The Free Grammar School of Queen Elizabeth of the Parishioners of the parish of St. Olave, by letters patent issued in 1571.
Page 205 - ... the point upwards : next came the queen, in the sixty-fifth year of her age, as we were told, very majestic; her face oblong, fair, but wrinkled ; her eyes small , yet black and pleasant ; her nose a little hooked ; her lips narrow, and her teeth black (a defect the English seem subject...
Page 205 - Royal scepter, the other the sword of state, in a red scabbard, studded with golden fleurs-de-lis, the point upwards : next came the Queen, in the sixty-fifth year of her age, as we were told, very majestic ; her face oblong, fair, but wrinkled ; her eyes small, yet black and pleasant ; her nose a little hooked ; her lips narrow, and her teeth black...
Page 206 - A gentleman entered the room bearing a rod, and along with him another who had a table-cloth, which, after they had both kneeled three times with the utmost veneration, he spread upon the table, and, after kneeling again, they both retired. Then came two others, one with the rod again, the other with a salt-cellar, a plate, and bread ; when they had kneeled, as the others had done, and placed what was brought upon the table, they too retired with the same ceremonies performed by the first. A t last...
Page 205 - First went gentlemen, barons, earls, knights of the garter, all richly dressed and bare-headed: next came the chancellor, bearing the seals in a red silk purse between two; one of which carried the royal sceptre, the other the sword of state, in a red scabbard, studded with golden fleurs-de-lis, the point upwards...
Page 206 - At the end of all this ceremonial a number of unmarried ladies appeared, who, with particular solemnity, lifted the meat off the table, and conveyed it into the queen's inner and more private chamber, where, after she had chosen for herself, the rest goes to the ladies of the court. . . . The queen dines and sups alone, with very few attendants ; and it is very seldom that anybody, foreigner or native, is admitted at that time, and then only at the intercession of somebody in power.
Page 205 - In the chapel was excellent music ; as soon as it and the service was over, which scarce exceeded half an hour, the Queen returned in the same state and order, and prepared to go to dinner. But while she was still at prayers, we saw her table set out with the following solemnity: — " A gentleman entered the room bearing a rod, and along with him another who had a table-cloth, which, after they had both kneeled three times with the utmost veneration, he spread upon the table, and, after kneeling...

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