The Emerald City of Oz

Front Cover
1st World Publishing, 2004 - Fiction - 256 pages
Perhaps I should admit on the title page that this book is "By L. Frank Baum and his correspondents," for I have used many suggestions conveyed to me in letters from children. Once on a time I really imagined myself "an author of fairy tales," but now I am merely an editor or private secretary for a host of youngsters whose ideas I am requestsed to weave into the thread of my stories. These ideas are often clever. They are also logical and interesting. So I have used them whenever I could find an opportunity, and it is but just that I acknowledge my indebtedness to my little friends.
 

Selected pages

Contents

Authors Note
9
1 How the Nome King Became Angry
11
2 How Uncle Henry Got Into Trouble
19
3 How Ozma Granted Dorothys Request
26
4 How The Nome King Planned Revenge
34
5 How Dorothy Became a Princess
41
6 How Guph Visited the Whimsies
50
7 How Aunt Em Conquered the Lion
55
16 How Dorothy Visited Utensia
143
17 How They Came to Bunbury
152
18 How Ozma Looked into the Magic Picture
163
19 How Bunnybury Welcomed the Strangers
167
20 How Dorothy Lunched With a King
175
21 How the King Changed His Mind
184
22 How the Wizard Found Dorothy
193
23 How They Encountered the Flutterbudgets
202

8 How the Grand Gallipoot Joined The Nomes
66
9 How the Wogglebug Taught Athletics
73
10 How the Cuttenclips Lived
83
11 How the General Met the First and Foremost
95
12 How they Matched the Fuddles
106
13 How the General Talked to the King
118
14 How the Wizard Practiced Sorcery
124
15 How Dorothy Happened to Get Lost
133
24 How the Tin Woodman Told the Sad News
211
25 How the Scarecrow Displayed His Wisdom
218
26 How Ozma Refused to Fight for Her Kingdom
225
27 How the Fierce Warriors Invaded Oz
235
28 How They Drank at the Forbidden Fountain
239
29 How Glinda Worked a Magic Spell
246
30 How the Story of Oz Came to an End
252
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Best known as the author of the Wizard of Oz series, Lyman Frank Baum was born on May 15, 1856, in New York. When Baum was a young man, his father, who had made a fortune in oil, gave him several theaters in New York and Pennsylvania to manage. Eventually, Baum had his first taste of success as a writer when he staged The Maid of Arran, a melodrama he had written and scored. Married in 1882 to Maud Gage, whose mother was an influential suffragette, the two had four sons. Baum often entertained his children with nursery rhymes and in 1897 published a compilation titled Mother Goose in Prose, which was illustrated by Maxfield Parrish. The project was followed by three other picture books of rhymes, illustrated by William Wallace Denslow. The success of the nursery rhymes persuaded Baum to craft a novel out of one of the stories, which he titled The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Some critics have suggested that Baum modeled the character of the Wizard on himself. Other books for children followed the original Oz book, and Baum continued to produce the popular Oz books until his death in 1919. The series was so popular that after Baum's death and by special arrangement, Oz books continued to be written for the series by other authors. Glinda of Oz, the last Oz book that Baum wrote, was published in 1920.

Bibliographic information