False Economy: A Surprising Economic History of the World

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Penguin, Apr 16, 2009 - Business & Economics - 368 pages
7 Reviews
A "provocative...persuasive" (The New York Times) book that examines countries' economic destinies.

In False Economy, Alan Beattie weaves together the economic choices, political choices, economic history, and human stories, that determine whether governments and countries remain rich or poor.

He also addresses larger questions about why they make the choices they do, and what those mean for the future of our global economy. But despite the heady subject matter, False Economy is a lively and lucid book that engagingly and thought-provokingly examines macroeconomics, economic topics, and the fault lines and successes that can make or break a culture or induce a global depression. Along the way, readers will discover why Africa doesn't grow cocaine, why our asparagus comes from Peru, why our keyboard spells QWERTY, and why giant pandas are living on borrowed time.
 

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Review: False Economy: A Surprising Economic History of the World

User Review  - Goodreads

Actually quite informative. I'm usually pretty loathe to rate journalists' books - I prefer profs for the most part - but this was wildly informative on world trade. Read full review

Review: False Economy: A Surprising Economic History of the World

User Review  - Goodreads

Love economic history. Read full review

Contents

WHY DID ARGENTINA SUCCEED AND THE UNITED STATES STALL?
WHY DIDNT WASHINGTON DCGET THE VOTE?
WHY DOES EGYPT IMPORT HALF ITS STAPLE FOOD?
WHY ARE OIL AND DIAMONDS MORE TROUBLE THAN THEY ARE WORTH?
WHY DONT ISLAMIC COUNTRIES GET RICH?
WHY DOES OUR ASPARAGUS COME FROM PERU?
WHY DOESNT AFRICA GROW COCAINE?
WHY DID INDONESIA PROSPER UNDER A CROOKED RULER AND TANZANIA STAY POOR UNDER AN HONEST ONE?
WHY ARE PANDAS SO USELESS?
OUR REMEDIES OFT IN OURSELVES DO LIE
PREFACE
Copyright

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