The North American Review, Volume 15

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University of Northern Iowa, 1822 - North American review and miscellaneous journal
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Page 31 - ... we hold every man subject to taxation in proportion to his property, and we look not to the question, whether he himself have, or have not, children to be benefited by the education for which he pays. We regard it as a wise and liberal system of police, by which property, and life, and the peace of society are secured. We seek to prevent, in some measure, the extension of the penal code, by inspiring a salutary and conservative principle of virtue and of knowledge in an early age.
Page 32 - Advance, then, ye future generations ! "We would hail you, as you rise in your long succession, to fill the places which we now fill, and to taste the blessings of existence where we are passing, and soon shall have passed, our own human duration. We bid you welcome to this pleasant land of the fathers.
Page 109 - ... the doctrine of the immortality of the soul, and of a future state of rewards and punishments...
Page 23 - We listen to the chiefs in council ; we see the unexampled exhibition of female fortitude and resignation ; we hear the whisperings of youthful impatience, and we see, what a painter of our own has also represented by his pencil,! chilled and shivering childhood, houseless, but for a mother's arms, couchless, but for a mother's breast, till our own blood almost freezes.
Page 374 - Urup, viz : to the 45 50' northern latitude, is exclusively granted to Russian subjects. SEC. 2. It is therefore prohibited to all foreign vessels, not only to land on the coasts and islands belonging to Russia, as stated above, but also to approach them within less than an hundred Italian miles. The transgressor's vessel is subject to confiscation, along with the whole cargo.
Page 210 - It has been a matter of marvel, to my European readers, that a man from the wilds of America should express himself in tolerable English. I was looked upon as something new and strange in literature ; a kind of demi-savage, with a feather in his hand, instead of on his head; and there was a curiosity to hear what such a being had to say about civilized society.
Page 374 - THE pursuits of commerce, •whaling, and fishery, and of all other industry, on all Islands, Ports, and Gulfs, including the whole of the North-west Coast of America, beginning from...
Page 23 - There is a local feeling connected with this occasion, too strong to be resisted ; a sort of genius of the place, which inspires and awes us. We feel that we are on the spot where the first scene of our history was laid ; where the hearths and altars of New England were first placed ; where Christianity and civilization and letters made their first lodgment, in a vast extent of country, covered with a wilderness, and peopled by roving barbarians.
Page 203 - And whereas the difficulty of agreeing on the precise cases in which alone provisions and other articles not generally contraband may be regarded as such, renders it expedient to provide against the inconveniences and misunderstandings which might thence arise : It is further agreed that whenever any such articles so becoming contraband, according to the existing laws of nations, shall for that reason be seized...
Page 32 - The hours of this day are rapidly flying, and this occasion will soon be passed. Neither we nor our children can expect to behold its return. They are in the distant regions of futurity, they exist only in the all-creating power of God, who shall stand here, a hundred years hence, to trace, through us, their descent from the Pilgrims, and to survey, as we have now surveyed, the progress of their country, during the lapse of a century.

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