The Wanting Seed

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 1963 - Fiction - 285 pages
The Wanting Seed is a Malthusian comedy about the strange world that overpopulation will produce. Tristram Foxe and his wife, Beatrice-Joanna, live in their skyscraper world of spacelessness where official family limitation glorifies homosexuality ("It's Sapiens to be Homo"). This time of the near future is eventually transformed into a chaos of cannibalistic dining-clubs, fantastic fertility rituals, and wars without enemies. The Wanting Seed is a novel both extravagantly funny and grimly serious.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - technodiabla - LibraryThing

My first Burgess novel....what a ride! I admire his writing and immense and obscure vocabulary. The plot leaves something to be desired. As a a political satire it is brilliant and worthy of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - William345 - LibraryThing

A dystopic satire set in a future in which an overbearing government tries to deal with horrendous population growth. The government obsesses about whether it can feed the vast population. As a means ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
17
Section 3
23
Section 4
35
Section 5
47
Section 6
53
Section 7
57
Section 8
65
Section 15
163
Section 16
173
Section 17
175
Section 18
178
Section 19
184
Section 20
187
Section 21
198
Section 22
217

Section 9
96
Section 10
109
Section 11
125
Section 12
130
Section 13
136
Section 14
143
Section 23
231
Section 24
255
Section 25
269
Section 26
273
Section 27
281
Copyright

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About the author (1963)

Anthony Burgess was born in 1917 in Manchester, England. He studied language at Xaverian College and Manchester University. He had originally applied for a degree in music, but was unable to pass the entrance exams. Burgess considered himself a composer first, one who later turned to literature. Burgess' first novel, A Vision of Battlements (1964), was based on his experiences serving in the British Army. He is perhaps best known for his novel A Clockwork Orange, which was later made into a movie by Stanley Kubrick. In addition to publishing several works of fiction, Burgess also published literary criticism and a linguistics primer. Some of his other titles include The Pianoplayers, This Man and Music, Enderby, The Kingdom of the Wicked, and Little Wilson and Big God. Burgess was living in Monaco when he died in 1993.

Bibliographic information