The Story of the Twenty-first Regiment, Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, During the Civil War. 1861-1865

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Press of the Stewart Printing Company, 1900 - Connecticut - 498 pages
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Page 392 - All quiet along the Potomac," they say, "Except now and then a stray picket Is shot, as he walks on his beat, to and fro, By a rifleman hid in the thicket.
Page 377 - For I am a man under authority, having soldiers under me: and I say to this man, Go, and he goeth; and to another, Come, and he cometh; and to my servant, Do this, and he doeth it.
Page 393 - Far away in the cot on the mountain. His musket falls slack, — his face, dark and grim, Grows gentle with memories tender, As he mutters a prayer for the children asleep, — For their mother, — may Heaven defend her...
Page 219 - ... to hammer continuously against the armed force of the enemy and his resources, until by mere attrition, if in no other way, there should be nothing left to him but an equal submission with the loyal section of our common country to the constitution and laws of the land.
Page 392 - Except now and then a stray picket Is shot, as he walks on his beat, to and fro, By a rifleman hid in the thicket. "Tis nothing : a private or two now and then Will not count in the news of the battle ; Not an officer lost, only one of the men Moaning out all alone the death-rattle.
Page 386 - How dear to my heart are the scenes of my childhood; When fond recollection presents them to view; The orchard, the meadow, the deep tangled wildwood. And every loved spot which my infancy knew...
Page 343 - Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York ; And all the clouds that lour'd upon our house In the deep bosom of the ocean buried. Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths ; Our bruised arms hung up for monuments ; Our stern alarums changed to merry meetings, Our dreadful marches to delightful measures.
Page 11 - I will bear true faith and allegiance to the United States of America; that I will serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies whomsoever; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to the rules and articles of war.
Page 393 - And the life-blood is ebbing and plashing. All quiet along the Potomac to-night, No sound save the rush of the river ; While soft falls the dew on the face of the dead, — The picket's off duty, forever...
Page 393 - Leaped up to his lips — when low-murmured vows Were pledged to be ever unbroken. Then drawing his sleeve roughly over his eyes, He dashes off tears that are welling, And gathers his gun closer up to its place, As if to keep down the heart-swelling.

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