Life of Petrarch, Volume 1

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Page 162 - Never hear the sweet music of speech I start at the sound of my own. The beasts that roam over the plain, My form with indifference see; They are so unacquainted with man, Their tameness is shocking to me. Society, friendship, and love, Divinely bestowed upon man, Oh, had I the wings of a dove, How soon would I taste you again ! My sorrows I then might assuage In the ways of religion and truth, Might learn from the wisdom of age, And be cheered by the sallies of youth.
Page 164 - One of these gardens is shady, formed for contemplation, and sacred to Apollo. It overhangs the source of the river, and is terminated by rocks, and by places accessible only to birds. The other is nearer my cottage, of an aspect less severe, and devoted to Bacchus ; and, what is extremely singular, it is in the midst of a rapid river. The approach to it is over a bridge of rocks ; and there is a natural grotto under the rocks, which gives them the appearance of a rustic bridge.
Page 196 - The morning of the 8th of April, 1341, was ushered in by the sound of trumpets; and the people, ever fond of a show, came from all quarters to see the ceremony. Twelve youths selected from the best families of Rome, and clothed in scarlet, opened the procession, repeating as they went some verses, composed by the poet, in honour of the Roman people. They were followed by six citizens of Rome, clothed in green, and bearing crowns wreathed with diflerent flowers.
Page iii - ... vituperation of all previous writers upon the subject. De Sade abuses the whole Italian nation, accusing it, en masse, of gross ignorance in respect to our poet. Mr. Campbell abuses the whole Italian nation and De Sade. Not only this, but he is at great pains to be bitter upon Archdeacon Coxe, who had bequeathed to the library of the British Museum a Ms. Life of Petrarch. Of this Ms., Mr. Colburn, it seems, caused a copy to be taken, and, intending it for publication, requested Mr. Campbell to...
Page 196 - Rome clothed in green, and bearing crowns wreathed with different flowers. Petrarch walked in the midst of them ; after him came the senator, accompanied by the first men of the council. The streets were strewed with flowers, and the windows filled with ladies dressed in the most splendid manner, who showered perfumed waters profusely on the poet. He all the time wore the robe that had been presented to him by the king of Naples. When they reached the Capitol, the trumpets were silent, and Petrarch,...
Page 165 - The approach to it is over a bridge of rocks ; and there is a natural grotto under the rocks ; which gives them the appearance of a rustic bridge. Into this grotto the rays of the sun never penetrate. I am confident that it much resembles the place where Cicero sometimes went to declaim. It invites to study. Hither I retreat during the noontide hours; my mornings are engaged upon the hills, or in the garden sacred to Apollo. Here I would most willingly pass my days, were I not too near Avignon, and...
Page 160 - Its opening is an arch sixty feet high ; but it is a double cavern, there being an interior one with an entrance thirty feet high. In the midst of these there is an oval basin, having eighteen fathoms for its longest diameter, and from this basin rises the copious stream which forms the Sorgue. The surface of the fountain is black, an appearance produced by its depth, from the darkness of the rocks, and the obscurity of the cavern ; for, on being brought to light, nothing can be clearer than its...
Page 164 - I must confess to you a more than female weakness with which I am haunted. I am positively angry that there is anything so beautiful out of Italy. " One of these gardens is shady, formed for contemplation, and sacred to Apollo. It overhangs the source of the river, and is terminated by rocks, and by places accessible only to birds.
Page 350 - lohannes noster, homo natus ad laborem, ad dolorem meum, et vivens gravibus atque perpetuis me curis exercuit, et acri dolore moriens vulneravi!, qui, cum paucos letos dies vixisset in vita sua, obiit anno Domini 1361, etatis sue XXV, die lulii X seu IX medio noctis, inter diem Veneris et Sabbati. Rumor ad me Paduam XIIII mensis ad vesperam.
Page 161 - Vauclusc, which tradition says was his habitation. If his object was to forget Laura, the composition of sonnets upon her in this hermitage was unlikely to be an antidote to his recollections. It would seem as if he meant to cherish rather than to get rid of his love. But if he nursed his passion, it was a...

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