A manual of Roman antiquities

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T. Cadell, 1836
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Page 365 - XVIII. XVII. XVI. XV. XIV. XIII. XII. XI. X. IX. VIII. VII. VI. V. IV.
Page 365 - XVI XV XIV XIII XII XI X IX VIII VII VI V IV III J St ^ * g i 1 Go co p . •* p.
Page 15 - Rome by observing that the empire was above two thousand miles in breadth, from the wall of Antoninus and the northern limits of Dacia to Mount Atlas and the tropic of Cancer; that it extended in length more than three thousand miles, from the Western Ocean to the Euphrates; that it was situated in the finest part of the Temperate Zone, between the twenty-fourth and fifty-sixth degrees...
Page 10 - Genii tutelares" of a place sacred to the improvement of the mind, and the care of the body. The two other temples were dedicated to the two protecting divinities of the Antonine family, Hercules and Bacchus. In the principal building were, in the first place, a grand circular vestibule, with four halls on each side, for cold, tepid, warm, and steam baths ; in the centre was an immense square, for exercise, when the weather was unfavourable to it in the open air ; beyond it, a great hall, where...
Page 365 - XVIII XVII XVI XV XIV XIII XII XI X IX VIII VII VI v IV III p cT W S.
Page 359 - The intercalation of this month was left to the discretion of the pontificcs, who, by inserting more or fewer days, used to make the current year longer or shorter, as was most convenient for themselves or their friends; for instance, that a magistrate might sooner or later resign his office, or contractors for the revenue have longer or shorter time to collect the taxes.
Page 146 - Page. t)g afterwards enjoy any other magistracy ; that there should be no appeal to the tribunes ; that they should not be allowed to assemble the people and make harangues to them, nor propose laws, but should only retain the right of intercession.
Page 73 - ... to appear for them in court, to expound the law to them, civil and pontifical. On the other hand, the clients were obliged to be heartily dutiful and obedient to their patron, to promote his honour, to pay his mulcts and fines, to aid him, jointly with the members of his house, in bearing burthens for the commonwealth and defraying the charges of public offices, to contribute to the portioning of his daughters, and to ransom him or whoever of his family might fall into an enemy's hands.
Page 248 - Roman discipline ; nnd it was almost impossible it should prove unsuccessful, if duly observed. For fortune, in every engagement, must have failed them three several times, before they could be routed ; and the enemy must have had the strength and resolution to overcome them in three several encounters, for the decision of one battle ; whereas most other nations, and even the Grecians themselves, drawing: up their whole army as it were in one front, trusted themselves and fortunes to the success...
Page 140 - Roman people : 1 am to exhibit, with the greatest solemnity, the most sacred sports to Ceres, Liber, and Libera ; am to appease and conciliate the mother Flora to the people and city of Rome, by the celebration of the public games ; am to furnish out those ancient shows, the first which were called Roman, with all possible dignity and religion, in honour of Jupiter, Juno, Minerva ; am to take care, also, of all the sacred edifices, and, indeed, of the whole city 5,

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