Notes on the State of Virginia

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - History
15 Reviews
"Notes on the State of Virginia" was the only full-length book by Thomas Jefferson published during his lifetime. Having been first published anonymously in a private printing in Paris in 1784, "Notes on the State of Virginia" was later made available to the general public in a 1787 printing in England. Considered one of the most important American books published before the turn of the 19th century, the book deals extensively with important political, legal, and constitutional principles such as the separation of church and state, constitutional government, checks and balances, and individual liberty. "Notes on the State of Virginia" is essentially a discussion of what constitutes "good society", which Jefferson believed Virginia to be an example of. Filled with an extensive compilation of data this work represents an important primary source from one the most important American figures to ever have lived.
 

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Review: Notes on the State of Virginia

User Review  - Jason Goetz - Goodreads

Jefferson's best work, marking him as a brilliant scientist. Read full review

Review: Notes on the State of Virginia

User Review  - Goodreads

Jefferson's best work, marking him as a brilliant scientist. Read full review

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Contents

QUERY I
3
QUERY II
4
QUERY III
11
QUERY V
13
QUERY VI
16
QUERY VII
52
QUERY VIII
58
QUERY IX
62
QUERY XIV
89
QUERY XV
102
QUERY XVI
104
QUERY XVII
105
QUERY XVIII
108
QUERY XIX
109
QUERY XX
110
QUERY XXI
112

QUERY X
65
QUERY XI
68
QUERY XII
76
QUERY XIII
77
QUERY XXII
113
QUERY XXIII
116
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Politician, philosopher, farmer, architect, and author, Jefferson was born to Peter and Jane Randolph Jefferson on April 13, 1743, in Tuckahoe, Virginia. As Jefferson observed in his autobiography, his parents could "trace their pedigree far back in England and Scotland." At the age of 16, Thomas Jefferson entered William and Mary College; at age 24, Jefferson was admitted to the bar; at 25, he was elected to the Virginia Assembly. Renowned for his political contributions to the American colonies, and later, to the embryonic Republic, Jefferson published in 1774 A Summary View of the Rights of British America, celebrating the inalienable natural rights claimed by the colonialists. In 1775 Jefferson was elected to the Continental Congress; in 1776 he joined the five-person committee responsible for drafting the Declaration of Independence---a document that is widely regarded as being largely Jefferson's own work. In 1779 Jefferson was elected governor of the state of Virginia, and in subsequent years he distinguished himself both as a cosmopolitan international politician and as a man committed to the future of Virginia. In 1789 he was appointed U.S. secretary of state, in 1797 he served as vice president under President John Adams, and in 1801 he was elected third president of the United States. Jefferson's literary career was no less stellar than his political accomplishments. He authored tracts and books on such diverse subjects as gardening, the life of Jesus, the history of Virginia, and the practices of farming. The precise descriptions of nature that inform his Notes on the State of Virginia (1787) are frequently credited with foreshadowing the Hudson River school of aesthetics. Thomas Jefferson died on the fourth of July. His grave marker, engraved with words of his own choosing, states, "Here lies Thomas Jefferson, Author of the Declaration of American Independence, of the Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom and Father of the University of Virginia.

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