Little Women

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Jul 1, 2010 - Fiction - 456 pages
It is one of the most beloved novels in the English language, and its protagonists among the best friends a reader can have. Louisa May Alcott's Little Women-inspired by her own childhood with three sisters in Concord, Massachusetts-is the simple, elegant tale of tomboy Jo March, who strains against the limitations of women of her time, and dependable Meg, compassionate Beth, and spoiled Amy. Their childhood adventures and squabbles as well as their adult romances and travels continue to enthrall and delight readers a century and a half after the novel was first published, and have inspired stage plays, comic books, and countless film adaptations.Timelessly classic, this is an essential work for any library of 19th-century literature.LOUISA MAY ALCOTT (1832-1888), one of the most well-known American novelists of the 19th century, was born on November 29, 1832 to transcendentalist educator Amos Bronson Alcott and his wife, Abigail May Alcott. She was the second of four sisters (like Jo, her literary corollary), and grew up in a family that encouraged and sympathized with her abolitionist and feminist leanings. As a child she received instruction from noted literary figures such as Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, and Nathaniel Hawthorne, all family friends. In addition to the Little Women series, which included four novels, she wrote 28 other works, three under the pen name A.M Barnard. Though Alcott had chronic health problems in her later years, most likely attributed to an autoimmune disease, she continued to write until her death at 55 in 1888.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - haloedrain - LibraryThing

I didn't expect to like this book because the bits of the movie I've seen seemed saccharine and preachy--and it is, but the characters are so well described that I really liked a lot of it despite that. It gets pretty heavy handed and tedious in parts of the second half, though. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
11
III
21
IV
30
V
41
VI
52
VII
58
VIII
64
XXV
222
XXVI
228
XXVII
237
XXVIII
244
XXIX
258
XXX
269
XXXI
279
XXXII
288

IX
74
X
89
XI
96
XII
107
XIII
125
XIV
133
XV
142
XVI
149
XVII
157
XVIII
163
XIX
171
XX
178
XXI
184
XXII
195
XXIII
201
XXIV
212
XXXIII
299
XXXIV
310
XXXV
323
XXXVI
333
XXXVII
338
XXXVIII
348
XXXIX
359
XL
371
XLI
376
XLII
387
XLIII
394
XLIV
408
XLV
413
XLVI
419
XLVII
431
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About the author (2010)

Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Two years later, she moved with her family to Boston and in 1840 to Concord, which was to remain her family home for the rest of her life. Her father, Bronson Alcott, was a transcendentalist and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Alcott early realized that her father could not be counted on as sole support of his family, and so she sacrificed much of her own pleasure to earn money by sewing, teaching, and churning out potboilers. Her reputation was established with Hospital Sketches (1863), which was an account of her work as a volunteer nurse in Washington, D.C. Alcott's first works were written for children, including her best-known Little Women (1868--69) and Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys (1871). Moods (1864), a "passionate conflict," was written for adults. Alcott's writing eventually became the family's main source of income. Throughout her life, Alcott continued to produce highly popular and idealistic literature for children. An Old-Fashioned Girl (1870), Eight Cousins (1875), Rose in Bloom (1876), Under the Lilacs (1878), and Jack and Jill (1881) enjoyed wide popularity. At the same time, her adult fiction, such as the autobiographical novel Work: A Story of Experience (1873) and A Modern Mephistopheles (1877), a story based on the Faust legend, shows her deeper concern with such social issues as education, prison reform, and women's suffrage. She realistically depicts the problems of adolescents and working women, the difficulties of relationships between men and women, and the values of the single woman's life.

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