A short history of English versification from the earliest times to the present day: a handbook for teachers and students

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Norwood Editions, 1911 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 396 pages
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Contents

XX Century
11
Section I
14
Alliterative Verse the common property of all Germanic Peoples
15
Origin of Alliterative Verse
16
Division into Stanzas
17
Metrical Unity of the Long Line
20
Theories concerning the Rhythmical Construction of Alliterative Verse
21
Rules of the FourBeat Theory
22
MUllenhoff Jessen Amelung Heyne
24
Wackernagel
26
Laws of the TwoBeat Theory
27
J4 Criticism of the TwoBeat Theory
28
conclusion
30
Insufficiency of the TwoBeat Theory
32
Sievers
33
Outline of Sievers System
35
The Five Types
36
Type A
37
Type B
39
Type E
42
The Combination of Two Types to form a Long Line
43
37 cont
45
cont
46
B conclusion
48
10 The correct Division of Sievers Types
49
Spread of Sievers System
50
Mollers Theory
51
Criticism of Mollers System
52
Hirts Theory
54
Fuhr
55
Ten Brink
56
Criticism of ten Brinks Theory
58
A new attempt with the strict FourBeat Theory
59
Law stating when Prefixes may have a Beat
60
Law stating when a Disyllabic Word with a short rootsyllable at the end of a verse may have two Beats
61
The Application of these Laws
63
Compatibility of the FourBeat Theory with Sievers Types
64
Derivation from a Common IndoGfrmanic origi nal Verse
65
Kogel
67
Trautmann
68
Trautmanns 16+12 Verseforms
70
Criticism of Trautmanns System
71
Martin
73
Neither two nor four Beats but four Members
74
Division of Alliterative Verses into 90 Subspecies according to their Composition
75
Feminine Masculine and Gliding Verseending
79
Types 110 Sievers Ai
82
Types 1120 Sievers A
84
Typts 2128 Sievers As
85
Types 29 30 A
86
B Verses with Masculine Ending
87
Types 3110 Sievers B
88
Types 4150 Sievers D
90
Types 49 50
91
Types 5160 Sievers E
92
C VerseB with Gliding Ending
93
Types 6170 Sievers C
94
Types 7188 Sievers D1
95
Types 89 90 Sievers A
96
a Strongly stressed Parts of Speech
97
b Weakly stressed Parte of Speech
100
Frequency of the individual Types
101
The Relation of the first HalfLine to the Second
103
Combination of two HalfLines to form a Long Line
104
Examples
106
Later Alliterative Verse Alliterative Prose
107
Schwellverse Lengthened Lines
109
Lengthened Lines in Beowulf
110
are normal Verses with extended Anacrusis
111
Recitation of Lengthened Lines
113
Simple Alliteration
114
Crossed Alliteratlon
117
Enjambement of the Alliteration
118
How far the various kinds of words may alliterate
119
Vowel and Consonant Alliteration
121
How frequently the various Sounds alliterate
123
Rime
124
Section II
127
a The early ME Period 11001250
128
Influence of Foreign Models in ME
129
Introduction of Rime
130
Last alliterative Verses in early ME
132
The old Verse Types in Brut
133
Alliteration in Brut
134
Rime in Brut
135
a Schipper
136
b Trautmann
137
Lajamons Verse has four Members
139
Proverbs of Alfred
140
Rhythmical Structure of King Horn
142
Views of Wissmann Luick and Schipper
144
b The French Verse of Eight Syllables
146
The ME Short Rimed Couplet
147
Havelok
148
Difference between Verse of four Bars and Verse of four Members
149
Difference between ME Short Rimed Couplet and Latin and French Verse of Eight Syllables
150
Josephslied
164
Interchange of various Kinds of Verse
165
3 Stanza Formation
167
a Masculine Rime
168
c Gliding Rime
169
Rime of Unstressed and weakly Stressed Syllables
171
Impure Rime
173
Assonance
174
Inexact Rime
175
Identical Rime
176
Different kinds of Identical Rime
177
Identical Rime cont
179
Double Rime
180
Position of the Rime
181
Development of Prosody in the Central ME Period
184
The Short Rimed Couplet
185
Septenaries in Rimed Couplets
186
Verses with one two and three Bars
188
The Alexandrine
189
The ME Alliterative Verse
191
a Skeat Schipper Luick
192
b Rosenthal Trautmann etc Kuhnke Bunzen
195
Rhythmical Structure of ME Alliterative Verse
199
Stanza Structure
205
The Unity of the Stanza
206
Refrain
207
Classification
208
Unrimed Stanzas
210
The Rimed Couplet
212
Fourline Stanza aabb
213
B aaaa
214
abab
215
Eightline Stanza abababab
216
ababbcbc
218
Twelveline Stanzas ababababbcbcababababcdcd
219
The Tristrem Stanza ababababybc
221
Thirteenline Stanza ababababydddc
223
Tailrime Stanza
225
Twelveline Tailrime Stanza
228
Eightline and Sixteenline Tailrime Stanzas
230
aaabab
232
Development of Prosody in late ME
233
Rimebreaking and Enjambement
234
Sir Thopas
235
Gowers Barbours and Lydgates Short Rimed Couplet
238
Heroic Verse
239
cont
241
Origin of Heroic Verse
245
Rhythmical Structure of Chaucers Heroic Verse
246
Wordstress in Chaucers Heroic Verse
249
Caesura in Heroic Verse
252
Enjambement and Rimebreaking in Heroic Verse
254
Chaucers use of Rime and Alliteration
256
Chaucers Eightline Stanza
258
Hoccleve
259
Lydgate
260
Scotch Poets
261
Septenary and Alliterative Verse
263
Stanza Construction
264
Modern English Period 201 Development of Prosody in NE
266
Influence of Linguistic Alterations on the Regu larity of NE Verse
267
20 Generally Masculine Verseending
269
Rising and Falling Rhythm
270
Influence of Foreign Models on NE Verse
271
Wordstress and Versestress Inverted Accent Hovering Accent
272
Quantity
277
Temporal Uniformity Coincidence of Foot and Word
281
Rime and Alliteration
284
The Septenary
285
The Alexandrine
287
Heroic Verse
288
Fourbar and Fourbeat Verses
296
Verses of one two and three Bars
301
Blank Verse
302
Shakespeares Blank Verse
305
Dramatic Blank Verse before and after Shake speare
313
Miltons Blank Verse
314
Blank Verse in XVIII and XIX Centuries
316
Trochaic Verse
320
Anapaestic Verse
324
Dactylic Verse 827
327
The Hexameter
329
Walt Whitman
335
NE Stanzas
338
Poulters Measure
341
Common Metre
343
Elegiac Stanza
346
In Memoriam Stanza
348
Stanzas of Eight and Twelve Lines
350
Variations of the Tailrime Stanza
353
Chaucers eightline Stanza
359
Epithalamion Stanza
367
45 Imitations of Latin Metres
373
The Sonnet in the XVI and XVII Centuries
379
French Stanzas
386

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