The Olive Fairy Book

Front Cover
Andrew Lang, Henry Justice Ford
Longmans, Green, and Company, 1907 - Fairy tales - 336 pages
3 Reviews
Twenty-nine tales from the folklore of Turkey, India, Denmark, Armenia, and the Sudan.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nmhale - LibraryThing

This collection of fairy tales is similar to the first that I read, The Yellow Fairy Book, in that it amasses a wide range of fairy and folk tales from various countries in Europe and Asia (with ... Read full review

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Nice variety. Stories are short and hold your attention! A nice change from a long novel

Contents

I
v
II
1
III
9
IV
27
V
43
VI
64
VII
71
VIII
87
XVI
178
XVII
188
XVIII
198
XIX
209
XX
214
XXI
232
XXII
240
XXIII
245

IX
103
X
108
XI
119
XII
131
XIII
144
XIV
152
XV
167
XXIV
254
XXV
274
XXVI
277
XXVII
287
XXVIII
299
XXIX
303
XXX
316

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Page 334 - "Oh, thou art fairer than the evening air, clad in the beauty of ten thousand stars,
Page 116 - in a voice that seemed to come from a long way off;
Page 125 - she could never forgive herself for not having come near her all this time, and that she would now begin to make amends for her neglect. That very evening Subbar Khan came and sat up late with the old fakir playing chess as usual. Very tired, he at length bade him and the princess
Page 119 - I will give you the chance of gratifying your wish.' Then he sent for an old lame fakir who lived in a tumbledown hut on the outskirts of the city, and when he had presented himself, the king said: 'No doubt, as you are very old and nearly crippled, you would be glad
Page 120 - And what am I to ask for it?' said the old man. 'Two gold pieces,' replied the princess. So the fakir hobbled away, and stood in the marketplace to sell the cloth. Presently the elder princess drove by, and when she saw the cloth she stopped and asked the price.
Page 122 - But Imani, who was only considering how she could best untie the knot without breaking the thread, replied: 'Patience!' meaning that the messenger should wait till she was able to attend to him. But the messenger went off with this as an answer, and told the king that the only thing
Page 122 - was completed he bought for Kupti a beautiful ruby necklace. Then he said to a servant: 'The princess Imani wants some patience. I did not know there was such a thing, but you must go to the market and inquire, and if any is to be sold, get it
Page 120 - in the morning, she had spun the finest thread that ever was seen. Next she went to the loom and wove and wove until by the evening she had woven a beautiful silver cloth. 'Now,' said she to the fakir, 'go into the market-place and sell my cloth
Page 124 - the presents he had brought for them. Imani was very surprised when the casket was brought to her by the hand of a messenger. 'But,' she said, 'what is this? I never asked for anything! Indeed I had no time, for the messenger ran away before I had

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