Living and Dying with Cancer

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jun 24, 2004 - Social Science - 194 pages
Living and Dying with Cancer is a powerful and moving account of the experiences of those affected by one of the most common causes of death in the Western world. Through a series of individual narratives based on extensive interviews carried out by the author, the book explores the impact of being diagnosed with cancer on those with the disease and the people around them. It follows the different trajectories of the disease from the very first symptoms, through treatment to death and shows how the experience of the disease and even the way it develops is affected by the social context of the people involved, as well as their own physical and psychological characteristics. This book will be an invaluable resource not only for social scientists and health professionals but also for those coming to terms with the impact of cancer on their own lives.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Mortality in modern culture
7
The principal respondents
14
Bereaved respondents
15
Stage One Departure
16
Finding the symptoms
17
Consulting the professionals
28
Diagnosis
34
Treatment
65
Chapter summary
78
Stage Three Anticipation
81
Chapter summary
132
Stage Four Destination
135
Hospice case studies
155
Chapter summary
174
Last words
176

Chapter summary
48
Stage Two Exploration
51
The tests
55

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Page v - Death is no enemy of life; it restores our sense of the value of living. Illness restores the sense of proportion that is lost when we take life for granted. To learn about value and proportion, we need to honor illness, and ultimately to honor death. Arthur VC'.
Page v - Only when dedicated to such action, my life counts; its termination, its being-no-more, my death, is no more a senseless, absurd, unjustifiable occurrence: not that sinking into the emptiness of nonexistence it once was - that vanishing which changes nothing in the world. Through making myself for-the-other, I make myself for-myself, I pour meaning into my being-in-the-world...

About the author (2004)

Angela Armstrong-Coster is a Lecturer in the School of Social Science, University of Southampton, with interests in palliative care, death and dying and narrative research. She is also a regular contributor to the media in these areas.

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