The Builders of the Nation: A History of the United States, Including Portraits and Biographies of Presidents, Cabinet Officers, Statesmen, Legislators, Jurists, Educators, Authors, Editors, and Divines

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Stanley-Bradley Publishing Company, 1892 - United States - 539 pages
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Page 278 - If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it; if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it; and if I could do it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that. What I do about slavery and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save this Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union.
Page 439 - And what is so rare as a day in June ? Then, if ever, come perfect days ; . Then Heaven tries the earth if it be in tune, And over it softly her warm ear lays: Whether we look, or whether we listen, We .hear life murmur, or see it glisten ; Every clod feels a stir of might, An instinct within it that reaches and towers, And, groping blindly above it for light, Climbs to a soul in grass and flowers...
Page 278 - But negroes, like other people, act upon motives. Why should they do anything for us if we will do nothing for them ? If they stake their lives for us they must be prompted by the strongest motive, even the promise of freedom. And the promise, being made, must be kept.
Page 140 - MR. STRAHAN: — You are a member of Parliament, and one of that majority which has doomed my country to destruction. You have begun to burn our towns, and murder our people. Look upon your hands ; they are stained with the blood of your relations! You and I were long friends; you are now my enemy, and I am, Yours, B. FRANKLIN.
Page 158 - ... the occasion has been deemed proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintained, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers...
Page 405 - With wan, fevered face tenderly lifted to the cooling breeze, he looked out wistfully upon the ocean's changing wonders ; on its far sails whitening in the morning light ; on its restless waves rolling shore-ward to break and die beneath the noonday sun ; on the red clouds of evening arching low to the horizon ; on the serene and shining pathway of the stars. Let us think that his dying eyes read a mystic meaning which only the rapt and parting soul may know. Let us believe that in the silence of...
Page 123 - The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions ; the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other.
Page 136 - For instance, my breakfast was a long time bread and milk (no tea), and I ate it out of a twopenny earthen porringer with a pewter spoon.
Page 454 - In their bloom, And the names he loved to hear Have been carved for many a year On the tomb.
Page 349 - VII of the said treaty, by a majority of four voices to one, awards to the United States a sum of $15,500,000 in gold, as the indemnity to be paid by Great Britain to the United States, for the satisfaction of all the claims referred to the consideration of the tribunal, conformably to the provisions contained in article VII of the aforesaid treaty.

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