"Is this English?": Race, Language, and Culture in the Classroom

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Teachers College Press, 2004 - Education - 173 pages
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This is the story of a white high school English teacher, Bob Fecho, and his students of colour who mutually engage issues of literacy, language, learning, and culture. Through his journey, Fecho presents a method of "critical inquiry" that allows students and teachers to take intellectual and social risks in the classroom to make meaning together and, ultimately, to transform literacy education.

Featuring the voices, beliefs, and struggles of urban adolescents and their teachers, this important book: describes how critical inquiry enabled students and teachers to cross cultural boundaries and enact a pedagogy that empowers students; provides a much-needed alternative to current best practice thinking and educational mandates that demean teacher knowledge and alienate adolescent students; and demonstrates how difficult realities can and should enter the classroom, showing teachers how to channel them into language, discourse, and classroom projects that improve students' literacy and thinking.

 

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Do you refer to Rayna Goldfarb of Philadelphia in your book? If so, you could not have chosen a more wonderful mentor and friend. Let me know! I recently contributed to a book on ethics.
Thanks,
Noelle Jacquelin

Contents

A Sense of Beginning A Beginning of Sense
1
Hopelessness and Possibility
12
Twos Company
26
Some of Ny Best Friends Are Theorists
39
Yo Wazzup?
51
Why Are You Doing This?
71
Learning as Aaron
91
Refusing to Go Along with the Joke
113
In Search of Wise Beauty and Beautiful Wisdom
138
NOTES
159
INDEX
165
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
173
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About the author (2004)

Bob Fecho taught secondary English for over 20 years in Philadelphia before joining the Reading Education department at the University of Georgia, where he now teaches and conducts research on adolescent literacy.

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