The Comparative Reception of Darwinism

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University of Chicago Press, Sep 24, 1988 - Science - 505 pages
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The reaction to Darwin's Origin of Species varied in many countries according to the roles played by national scientific institutions and traditions and the attitudes of religious and political groups. The contributors to this volume, including M. J. S. Hodge, David Hull, and Roberto Moreno, gathered in 1972 at an international conference on the comparative reception of Darwinism. Their essays look at early pro- and anti-Darwinism arguments, and three additional comparative essays and appendices add a larger perspective. For this paperback edition, Thomas F. Glick has added a new preface commenting on recent research.
 

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Contents

England
5
The Learned Societies
34
Bibliographical Essay
77
Germany
83
German Editions of Important Works on Evolution
117
France
119
Bibliographical Essay
166
United States
170
Spain
309
Mexico
348
The Islamic World
377
Darwinism and Historiography
390
Varieties of Catholic Reaction
405
Darwinism and Darwinian Evolution in the Study of Society and Culture
439
Evolutionism in America The Persistence of the War between Religion and Science
479
Evolutionism in the Soviet Union and America The Persistence of the War between Materialism and Idealism
482

Bibliographical Essay
209
Biological Sciences
229
Social Sciences
258
The Netherlands
271
A NineteenthTwentiethCentury Evolutionary Methodology The Conditional Mode as Historic Proof
485
Notes on Contributors
489
Index
491
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