Iceland: Or, The Journal of a Residence in that Island, During the Years 1814 and 1815, Volume 2

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Oliphant, Waugh and Innes, 1818 - Iceland
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Page 258 - He that rejecteth me, and receiveth not my words, hath one that judgeth him: the word that I have spoken, the same shall judge him in the last day.
Page 125 - Though poor the peasant's hut, his feasts though small, He sees his little lot the lot of all ; Sees no contiguous palace rear its head, To shame the meanness of his humble shed...
Page 133 - Thy sun shall no more go down ; neither shall thy moon withd'raw itself: for the Lord shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy mourning shall be ended.
Page 16 - Oh that thou wouldest rend the heavens, that thou wouldest come down, that the mountains might flow down at thy presence. As when the melting fire burneth, the fire causeth the waters to boil, to make thy name known to thine adversaries, that the nations may tremble at thy presence ! When thou didst terrible things which we looked not for, thou earnest down, the mountains flowed down at thy presence.
Page 52 - Now they made a conspiracy against him in Jerusalem ; and he fled to • Lachish; but they sent after him to Lachish, and slew him there. 20 And they brought him on horses ; and he was buried at Jerusalem with his fathers, in the city of David.
Page 175 - For the administration of this service not only supplieth the want of the saints, but is abundant also by many thanksgivings unto God; 13 Whiles by the experiment of this ministration they glorify God for your professed subjection unto the gospel of Christ, and for your liberal distribution unto them, and unto all men; 14 And by their prayer for you, which long after you for the exceeding grace of God in you.
Page 196 - A wilderness, a land of deserts and of pits, a land of drought, and of the shadow of death, a land that no man" (but a Christian) "passed through, and where no man dwelt.
Page 11 - Their width is very inconsiderable, being bounded on the one side by the river, and on the other by the great prairies, that cannot be inhabited for want of wood and water.
Page 162 - And the right honourable the lords commissioners of his majesty's treasury, his majesty's principal secretaries of state, the lords commissioners of the admiralty, and the judge of the high court of admiralty, and the judges of the courts of vice admiralty. are to take the necessary measures herein, as to them may respectively appertain.
Page 234 - ... boiled with much more vehemence. We went within a few yards of it, the wind happening to be remarkably favourable for viewing every part of this singular scene. The mud was in constant agitation, and often thrown up to the height of six or eight feet. Near this spot was an irregular space filled with water, boiling briskly. At the foot of the hill, in a hollow formed by a bank of clay and sulphur, steam rushed with great force and noise from among the loose fragments of rock.