Emerging Infections in Asia

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Yichen Lu, Max Essex, Bryan Roberts
Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 11, 2008 - Medical - 250 pages
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The number of people who live in Asia is greater than the total number of people who live in the rest of the world. More than 160 cities in Asia have a population of at least one million people. Thus, when new infectious diseases threaten popu- tions in Asia, huge segments of the global population are at risk. At the same time, Asians are thoroughly integrated with the rest of the world, providing skilled exp- tise and becoming trading partners in all continents. Infectious diseases ordinarily show no preference for infection or disease according to race or ethnic background. A few exceptions exist, due to the host– pathogen evolution that happened before the recent era of rapid travel. Such exc- tions occur usually because the infectious agent was newly introduced to one population only after having existed and evolved for hundreds or thousands of years in a different population. As air travel became popular in the last few generations of people, it became increasingly difficult for populations to remain in isolation. Thus, in 2003, SARS in China rapidly became SARS in Canada. Throughout history, a major source of new infections of people has been old infections of animals. For some, such as Ebola or Lassa, transmission to people is rare and self-limiting, though frighteningly lethal for the few unfortunate indivi- als who get infected. And Ebola and Lassa are indigenous for Africa, not Asia.
 

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Contents

Lu_Ch02pdf
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Lu_Ch03pdf
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Lu_Ch04pdf
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Lu_Ch05pdf
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Lu_Ch06pdf
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Lu_Ch07pdf
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Lu_Ch08pdf
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Lu_Ch11pdf
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Lu_Ch14pdf
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Lu_SubjectIndexpdf
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About the author (2008)

Yichen Lu is the Executive Director at the Institute for International Vaccine Development, Cambridge, MA; the Principal Research Scientist at the Harvard AIDS Institute; and the Special Professor and Director, Nankai Vaccine Laboratory, Nankai University, China.

Max Essex is the Chairman of the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health and Chairman of the Harvard AIDS Institute.

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