Varronianus: A Critical and Historical Introduction to the Ethnography of Ancient Italy and to the Philological Study of the Latin Language

Front Cover
J. W. Parker & Son, 1852 - Ethnology - 476 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

They preserve their national integrity in Etruria
11
The Etruscansthe authors theory respecting their origin
14
The names Etbuscus and Rasena cannot be brought to an agreement with Ttrsenus
16
It is explicitly stated by ancient writers that the Etruscans came from Rtia
17
This view of the case is after all the most reasonable
18
It is confirmed by all available evidence and especially by the contrast between the town and country languages of Etruria
19
Farther inferences derivable from a the traditionary his tory of the Luceres
21
6 Fragmentary records of the early constitution of Rome
23
c Etymology of some mythical proper names
24
General conclusion as to the mutual relations of the old Italian tribes
26
CHAPTER II
28
How tho Pelasgians came into Europe
30
lenic architecture
31
Supported by deductions from the contrasted mythology of the two races
36
Thracians Getse and Scythians
39
Scythians and Medes
40
Mode of discriminating the ethnical elements in this chain of nations
42
Peculiarities of the Scythian language suggested by Aristo phanes
44
Names of the Scythian rivers derived and explained
45
Names of the Scythian divinities
48
Other Scythian words explained
52
fate of the Mon golian race
55
The Pelasgians were of Sclavonian origin
58
Foreign affinities of the Umbrians c
59
Farther confirmation from etymology
61
Celtic tribes intermixed with the Sclavonians and Lithuanians in Italy and elsewhere
62
The Sarmatse probably a branch of the Lithuanian family
64
Gothic or LowGerman affinities of the ancient Etruscans shown by their ethnographic opposition to the Veneti
66
Reasons for comparing the old Etruscan with the Old Norse
68
Old Norse explanations of Etruscan proper names
69
Contacts and contrasts of the Semitic and the Sclavonian
72
Predominant Sclavonism of the old Italian languages
74
THB UMBRIAN LANGUAGE AS EXHIBITED IN THE EUGUBINE TABLES 1 The Eugubine Tables
78
guished
79
The Sibilants
80
Some remarks on the other letters
82
Umbrian grammatical forms
83
Tab L a 1
86
Tab I a 26
89
Tab L b 13 sqq
94
Extracts from the Litany in Tab VI a
96
Umbrian words which approximate to their Latin synonyms
99
The Todi Inscription contains four words of the same class
101
CHAPTER IV
104
tation
105
The Bantine Table
116
Commentary on the Bantine Table
119
The Cippus Abellanus
127
The bronze tablet of Agnone
130
TheAtellan
132
CHAPTER V
139
Names of Etruscan divinities derived and explained
143
Alphabetical list of Etruscan words interpreted
151
Etruscan Inscriptionsdifficulties attending their interpre tation
165
CHAPTER VI
193
ANALYSIS OF THE LATIN ALPHABET
238
The gutturals
245
The dentals
254
The vowels
260
The Greek letters used by the Romans
267
THB LATIN CASESYSTEM OCT PAGI 1 Fulness and deficiencies of the Latin casesystem
274
General scheme of the caseendings
275
Differences of crudeform
276
Hypothetical forms of the nominative and accusative plural
278
Existing formsthe genitive
280
The dative and locative
282
The accusative singular
283
The ablative
284
The vocative
286
Adverbs considered as cases of nouns
287
Adverbial expression for the day of the month
292
CHAPTER IX
293
General rules for the classification of Latin nouns t
294
First or a Declension
295
Second or o Declension
296
A First class or purely consonantal nouns
297
B Second class or semiconsonantal nouns
301
CHAPTER X
307
Indicative Pronouns
310
Distinctive Pronouns
315
Relative interrogative and indefinite Pronouns
318
Numerals and Degrees of Comparison
327
Prepositions
329
Negative particles
337
THE THEORY OF THE LATIN VERB net 1 The Latin verb generally defective
341
Doctrine of the Latin tenses
343
The substantive verbs 345 i
345
Paucity of organic formations in the regular Latin verb
350
General scheme of tenses in the Latin verb
351
Verbs which may bo regarded as parathetic compounds
352
Tenses of the vowelverbs which are combinations of the same kind
353
Organic derivation of the tenses in the consonant verb
355
The modal distinctionstheir syntax
356
Forms of tho infinitive and participlehow connected in derivation and meaning
359
The gerundium and gerundivum shown to be active and present
361
The participle in ttirus
365
The past tense of tho infinitivo active
369
THE LATIN CONJUGATIONS j 1 Tho conjugations are regulated by the samo principles as the declensions
372
Tho second or e conjugation
377
Tho third or i conjugation
382
The fourth or consonant conjugation A Mute verbs
384
B Liquid verbs
388
Semiconsonantal verbs
390
Irregular verbs A Additions to the present tense
391
B Abbreviated forms
397
Defective verbs
399
CHAPTER XIII
400
Derivation is merely extonded or ulterior inflexion
401

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 407 - Qui autem omnia, quae ad cultum deorum pertinerent, diligenter retractarent et tamquam relegerent, sunt dicti religiosi ex relegendo, ut elegantes ex eligendo, itemque ex diligendo diligentes, ex intelligendo intelligentes.
Page 477 - Independently of the original matter which will be found in almost every page, it is believed that this book presents a collection of known facts respecting the old languages of Italy which will be found in no single work, whether British or foreign, and which must be gleaned from a considerable number of rare and expensive publications ; and while the lists of Oscan and Etruscan glosses, and the...
Page 477 - Etruscan glosses, and the reprint of fragments and inscriptions, may render the treatise an indispensable addition to the dictionary, and a convenient manual for the professed student of Latin, it is hoped that the classical traveller in Italy will find the information amassed and arranged in these pages, sufficient to spare him the trouble of carrying with him a voluminous library of reference in regard to the subjects of which it treats.
Page 451 - Pro Deo amur et pro christian poblo et nostro commun salvament, d'ist di in avant, in quant Deus savir et podir me dunat, si salvarai eo cist meon fradre Karlo, et in...
Page 214 - Occentassint antiqui dicebant quod nunc convitium fecerint dicimus, quod id clare, et cum quodam canore fit, ut procul exaudiri possit. Quod turpe habetur, quia non sine causa fieri putatur.
Page iii - Varronianus. A Critical and Historical Introduction to the Ethnography of Ancient Italy, and to the Philological Study of the Latin Language. By the late JW DONALDSON, DD Third Edition, revised and considerably enlarged. 8vo. 16.
Page 158 - Tusco verbo ludio vocabatur, nomen histrionibus inditum; qui non, sicut ante, Fescennino versu similem incompositum temere ac rudem alternis iaciebant, sed impletas modis saturas descripto iam ad tibicinem cantu motuque congruenti peragebant.
Page 242 - Quintilian's bekannter stelle gefunden zu haben: nam et illa, quae est sexta nostrarum, paene non humana voce, vel omnino non voce potius, inter discrimina dentium efflanda est: quae, etiam quum vocalem proxime accipit, quassa quodammodo, utique quoties aliquam consonantem frangit, ut in hoc ipso frangit, multo fit horridior.
Page 113 - Aureliam familiam ex Sabinis oriundam a Sole dictam putant, quod ei publice a populo Romano datus sit locus, in quo sacra faceret Soli ; qui ex hoc Auseli dicebantur, ut Valesii, Papisii pro eo quod est Valerii, Papirii.
Page 214 - Sed si quidem ex causa donationis aut dotis aut qualibet alia ex causa tradantur, sine dubio transferuntur: venditae vero et traditae non aliter emptori adquiruntur quam si is venditori pretium solvent vel alio modo ei satisfecerit, veluti expromissore aut pignore dato, quod cavetur quidem etiam lege duodecim tabularum: tamen recte dicitur et jure gentium, id est jure naturali, id effici. [sed si is qui vendidit fidem emptoris secutus fuerit, dicendum est, statim rem emptoris fieri.] 42.

Bibliographic information