Homer: Odyssey XIII and XIV, Books 13-14

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Cambridge University Press, 2013 - History - 258 pages
The second part of the Odyssey takes epic in new directions, giving very significant roles to people of 'lower status' and their way of life: epic notions of the primacy of the aristocrat and of the achievements of the Trojan War are submitted to scrutiny. Books XIII-XIV contain some of the subtlest human exchanges in the poem, as Athena and Odysseus spar with each other and Odysseus tests the quiet patience of his swineherd Eumaeus. The principal themes and narrative structures, especially of disguise and recognition, which the second part uses with remarkable economy, are established here. The Introduction discusses these topics, and offers a detailed historical account of the Homeric dialect and remarks on metre; the Commentary pays particular attention to the exposition of unfamiliar linguistic forms and constructions. The literary parts of the Introduction and of the commentary are accessible to all.
 

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Contents

Sigla
58
ΟΜΗΡΟΥ ΟΔΥΣΣΕΙΑΣ
75
Commentary
91
Glossary of linguistic terms
234
Indexes
252
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Homer is the author of The Iliad and The Odyssey, the two greatest Greek epic poems. Nothing is known about Homer personally; it is not even known for certain whether there is only one true author of these two works. Homer is thought to have been an Ionian from the 9th or 8th century B.C. While historians argue over the man, his impact on literature, history, and philosophy is so significant as to be almost immeasurable. The Iliad relates the tale of the Trojan War, about the war between Greece and Troy, brought about by the kidnapping of the beautiful Greek princess, Helen, by Paris. It tells of the exploits of such legendary figures as Achilles, Ajax, and Odysseus. The Odyssey recounts the subsequent return of the Greek hero Odysseus after the defeat of the Trojans. On his return trip, Odysseus braves such terrors as the Cyclops, a one-eyed monster; the Sirens, beautiful temptresses; and Scylla and Charybdis, a deadly rock and whirlpool. Waiting for him at home is his wife who has remained faithful during his years in the war. Both the Iliad and the Odyssey have had numerous adaptations, including several film versions of each.

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