Introduction to the Practice of Statistics Excel Manual with Macros

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Macmillan, Mar 4, 2005 - Mathematics - 224 pages
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An easy-to-use software package with excellent graphical capabilities, Excel is an ideal way to teach and learn statistics at the introductory level. By organizing data into spreadsheets, Excel allows for easy analysis and graphic exploration. Its versatility, convenience, and reliability make it an attractive alternative to specialized statistical software. This manual was written specifically for using Excel with David Moore and George McCabe's Introduction to the Practice of Statistics, Fifth Edition (IPS) - a text that advocates using statistical software to free students from computations, allowing them to focus on the more practical matters of data gathering and analysis. No prior knowledge of the software is necessary. The manual provides a detailed introduction to Excel in the context of IPS and follows the text chapter by chapter to show how to use Excel to work through specific examples and exercises. In addition, the author developed add-in macros to assist in creating boxplots and normal quantile plots, a capability that does not exist in standard Excel. The macros are available on the textbook companion Web sit and can be downloaded and used on your own computer. This manual is compatible with Excel 2000 (Windows) and Excel 2001 (Macintosh), and the code successfully operates under all subsequent versions of the software, It is also easily adaptable for students using eXcel 97 (Windows) or Excel 98 (Macintosh). - Back cover.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
15
CHAPTER 2
53
CHAPTER 3
71
Sampling Distributions
95
Introduction to Inference
103
CHAPTER 7
117
CHAPTER 8
135
CHAPTER 9
149
CHAPTER 10
167
CHAPTER 11
177
CHAPTER 12
185
CHAPTER 13
197
CHAPTER 14
207
CHAPTER 16
217
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

David S. Moore is a professor of psychology at Pitzer College and at Claremont Graduate University. He received his doctorate in developmental psychology from Harvard University and did his postdoctoral work at the City University of New York.

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