Field Guide to the Cascades & Olympics

Front Cover
The Mountaineers Books, Apr 1, 2004 - Nature - 317 pages
0 Reviews

* More than 700 color illustrations for easy identification
* Expanded with new sections on mushrooms, insects, and rock identification
* Handy color tabs for easy access, and quick reference index on back cover
Don't just call it a mushroom when it's a golden chanterelle; know your screech owl from your saw-whet owl; distinguish a monarch butterfly from a painted lady -- all with the help of this comprehensive guide to the common plants and animals of the Cascade and Olympic Mountains.
The species accounts have been updated with the latest taxonomic changes and, as before, include common name, scientific name, and description of important features, habitat, and geographic range.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
v
II
9
III
12
V
13
VI
17
VII
18
VIII
35
IX
49
XIV
157
XV
181
XVI
197
XVIII
198
XIX
211
XXI
230
XXII
236
XXIII
279

X
50
XI
64
XII
78

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 298 - A Field Manual for the Amateur Geologist: Tools and Activities for Exploring Our Planet.
Page 298 - Northwest Exposures: A Geologic Story of the Northwest. Missoula. Mont.: Mountain Press Publishing.
Page 298 - W. 1975. Guide to the Geology of Olympic National Park Seattle: University of Washmgton Press.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2004)

STEPHEN R. WHITNEY is the author of six books on natural history, including Western Forests (Knopf) and A Field Guide to the Grand Canyon (The Mountaineers Books). He is a former managing editor of the Sierra Club Bulletin, now Sierra, associate editor of The Mother Earth News, and contributing editor of Backpacker magazine. In addition, he was editorial manager of The Mountaineers Books for six years. A resident of Washington State since 1978, he and his wife live alongside a lovely river a few miles outside of Seattle.

ROB SANDELIN is a naturalist and environmental educator who has since childhood spent much of his life observing and studying nature in the mountains of the Northwest. He has served as a park naturalist at Yosemite National Park, Olympic National Park, and Denali National Park. Currently he teaches field skills to student naturalists at the Environmental Education School of the Sky Valley Education Center in Monroe, Washington. He is the author of This Week in the Woods, a series of natural history essays; the Cohousing Resource Guide; and the Intentional Communities Resource Pages website. He lives with family and friends in the Sharingwood Cohousing Community in Snohomish County.

Bibliographic information