Verita$

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PM Press, Sep 1, 2015 - History - 256 pages

A critical examination of Harvard’s monumental but disconcerting global influence and power, this book examines aspects of Harvard’s history not generally known. The book begins with analysis of Harvard’s involvement in the Salem Witch and Sacco-Vanzetti trials. Similarly disquieting, Harvard provided students as strikebreakers in both the 1912 Bread and Roses textile workers strike and the 1919 Boston police strike. Harvard administrators and scientists promoted eugenics in the early 20th century and had a deep impact on Nazi Germany’s race theories. Its contemporary ties to U.S. foreign policy and neoliberalism are also profound. Harvard’s management of Russian economic reform left nightmarish memories, and the university was compelled to pay more than $26 million after the U.S. government sued it. The book also examines Harvard’s investment policy for its massive endowment, its restrictive labor policies, and its devastation of the adjoining Allston-Brighton neighborhood into which it is expanding. Harvard’s motto is “VERITAS,” which means “truth” in Latin, and the author explores the ways Harvard has pursued money and power above its quest for truth.

 

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Contents

Prologue The Statue of Three Lies
1
Chapter 1 Profiling Harvard
7
Chapter 2 Governing Harvard
23
Rich White and Male
35
Chapter 4 Pentagon University
59
Chapter 5 Harvard and Foreign Policy
91
The Antiwar Movement
105
Chapter 7 Harvards Role in Russian Economic Reform
137
The Financial Crisis of 2008
167
Chapter 10 Harvard at a Crossroads
191
Epilogue Time to Stop the Mad Dash
205
About the Author
208
Acknowledgements
210
Photo Sources
212
Notes
217
Index
228

Chapter 8 Harvards Labor Policy and the 2001 Occupation
153

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About the author (2015)

Shin Eun-jung is a former television news writer. From 2000 to 2004 she directed the Gwangju Human Rights Film Festival, which screened documentaries from around the world, and she directed the award-winning film of the same title. John Trumpbour is the research director for the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School. He is the author of How Harvard Rules: Reason in the Service of Empire and Selling Hollywood to the World: U.S. and European Struggles for Mastery of the Global Film Industry, 1920–1950, which won the Allan Nevins Prize from the Society of American Historians. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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