A History of the People of Iowa

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Torch Press, 1921 - Iowa - 572 pages
 

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Page 258 - that as an express and fundamental condition to the acquisition of any territory from the republic of Mexico by the United States . . . neither slavery nor involuntary servitude shall ever exist in any part of the said territory.'
Page 41 - that the states which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that, as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some, to prepare definitely for a separation—amicably if they can, violently if they must.'
Page 41 - If this bill passes," he said, "the bonds of this union are virtually dissolved; that the states which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that, as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some, to prepare definitely for a separation—amicably if they can, violently if they must.'
Page 36 - of citizens of the United States;" and that they should in the meantime, "be maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property, and the religion which they profess.
Page 35 - but I already consider the colony as entirely lost, and it appears to me that in the hands of this growing power, it will be more useful to the policy and even to the commerce of France, than if I should attempt to keep it.
Page 47 - their constructed habitations, a space of ample sufficiency for their subsistence, and whatever they had annexed to themselves by personal labor, was undoubtedly by the law of nature theirs. But what is the right of a huntsman to the forest of a thousand miles over which he has accidentally ranged in quest of prey
Page 35 - I renounce it with the greatest regret. To attempt obstinately to retain it would be folly. I direct you to negotiate this affair with the envoys of the United States. Do not even await the arrival of Mr. Monroe.
Page 36 - This accession of territory strengthens for ever the power of the United States; and I have just given to England a maritime rival, that will sooner or later humble her pride.
Page 35 - I renounce Louisiana. It is not only New Orleans I will cede, it is the whole colony, without any reservation. I know the price of what I abandon ... I renounce it with the greatest regret. To attempt obstinately to retain it would be folly. I direct you to negotiate this affair with the envoys of the United States. Do not even
Page 30 - the great mart, where all the adjacent tribes, and even those who inhabit the most remote branches of the Mississippi, annually assemble about the latter part of May, bringing with them their furs to dispose of to the

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