The Plays and Fragments, Part 4

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Cambridge University Press, 1898
 

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Page 154 - I saw the dungeon walls and floor Close slowly round me as before, I saw the glimmer of the sun Creeping as it before had done, But through the crevice where it came...
Page 57 - He giveth snow like wool : he scattereth the hoar-frost like ashes. He casteth forth his ice like morsels : who can stand before his cold ? He sendeth out his word, and melteth them : he causeth his wind to blow, and the waters flow.
Page 149 - Ne. Forsake thee — no; but take thee, perchance, on a bitter voyage — that is the pain that haunts me. Ph. What meanest thou, my son? I understand not. Ne. I will tell thee all. Thou must sail to Troy, to the Achaeans and the host of the Atreidae. Ph. Oh, what hast thou said ? Ne. Lament not...
Page 227 - Lycian fount, I am leaving you — leaving you at last — I, who had never attained to such a hope! Farewell, thou sea-girt Lemnos; and speed me with fair course, for my contentment, to that haven whither I am borne by mighty fate, and by the counsel of friends, and by the all-subduing god who hath brought these things to fulfilment.
Page 185 - How meanest thou ? Ph. If it was thy hope to take me to that Trojan land which I abhor. Ch. Nay, so I deem it best. Ph. Leave me, then— begone! Ch. Welcome is thy word, right welcome. I am not loth to obey. Come, let us be going, each to his place in the ship! They begin to move away. Ph. By the Zeus who hears men's curses, depart not, I implore you! Ch. Be calm. Ph. Friends, in the gods
Page 171 - This youth is our commander; whatsoever he saith to thee, that answer is ours also. Ne, (to CHORUS) I shall be told by my chief that I am too soft-hearted; yet tarry ye here, if yon man will have it so, until the sailors have made all ready on board, and we have offered our prayers to the gods. Meanwhile, perhaps, he may come to a better mind concerning us. So we two will be going: and ye, when we call you, are to set forth with speed. Exeunt ODYSSEUS and NEOPTOLEMUS.
Page 85 - О consent, by the great Zeus of suppliants, my son — be persuaded! I supplicate thee on my knees, infirm as I am, poor wretch, and maimed! Nay, leave me not thus desolate, far from the steps of men! Nay, bring me safely to thine own home, or to Euboea, Chalcodon's seat; and thence it will be no long journey for me to Oeta, and the...
Page 105 - Laertes, when he heard the seer speak thus, straightway promised that he would bring this man and show him to the Achaeans — most likely, he thought, as a willing captive, but, if reluctant, then by force; adding that, should he fail in this, whoso wished might have his head. Thou hast heard all, my son, and I commend speed to thee, and to any man for whom thou carest. Ph. Hapless that I am! Hath he, that utter pest, sworn to bring me by persuasion to the Achaeans? As soon shall I be persuaded,...
Page 83 - ... of Poeas, farewell — heartily farewell; and the gods deliver thee from thy sickness, even as thou wouldst! But we must be going, so that we may set forth whenever the god permits our voyage. Ph. Do ye start now, my son ? Ne. Aye, prudence bids us watch the weather near our ship, rather than from afar. Ph. Now by thy father and by thy mother, my son — by all that is dear to thee in thy home — solemnly I implore thee, leave me not thus forlorn, helpless amid these miseries in which I live,...
Page 203 - I grant it; and thou hast shown the race, my son, from which thou springest — no child, thou, of Sisyphus, but of Achilles, whose fame was fairest when he was with the living, as it is now among the dead. Ne. Sweet to me is thy praise of my sire, and of myself; but hear the boon that I am fain to win from thee. Men must needs bear the fortunes given by the gods; but when they cling to self-inflicted miseries, as thou dost, no one can justly excuse or pity them. Thou hast become intractable; thou...

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