Other People's English: Code-Meshing, Code-Switching, and African American Literacy

Front Cover
This book presents an empirically grounded argument for a new approach of teaching writing to diverse students in the English language arts classroom. Responding to advocates of the "code-switching" approach, four uniquely qualified authors make the case for "code-meshing"--allowing students to use standard English, African American English, and other Englishes in formal academic writing and classroom discussions. This practical resource translates theory into a concrete roadmap for pre-and in-service teachers who wish to use code-meshing in the classroom to extend students' abilities as writers and thinkers and to foster inclusiveness and creativity. The text provides activities and examples from middle and high schools as well as college and addresses the question of how to advocate for code-meshing with skeptical administrators, parents, and students.
 

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Contents

Are You a Part of the Conversation?
1
African American English and the Promise of CodeMeshing
13
CodeMeshing or CodeSwitching?
53
CodeMeshing and Responsible Education in Two Middle School Classrooms
85
CodeMeshing and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy for College Writing Instruction
119
The Power of Language
153
References
157
Index
165
About the Authors
175
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Vershawn Ashanti Young, associate professor, University of Kentucky

Rusty Barrett, associate professor, University of Kentucky

Y'Shanda Young-Rivera, educational consultant and former Chicago public school teacher and administrator

Kim Brian Lovejoy, associate professor, Indiana University-Purdue and editor of The Journal of Teaching Writing

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