Posthumous memoirs of his own time by sir N.W. Wraxall

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1836
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Page 294 - Avaunt ! and quit my sight ! Let the earth hide thee ! Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold ; Thou hast no speculation in those eyes Which thou dost glare with ! Lady M.
Page 234 - Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown, And put a barren sceptre in my gripe, Thence to be wrenched with an unlineal hand, No son of mine succeeding.
Page 250 - Give forked counsel; take provoking gold On either hand, and put it up; these men, He knew, would thrive with their humility. And for his part he thought he should be blest To have his heir of such a suffering spirit, So wise, so grave, of so perplex'da tongue, And loud withal, that would not wag, nor scarce Lie still, without a fee; when every word Your worship but lets fall, is a cecchine!
Page 326 - ... lord chamberlain ; the master of the horse, and the groom of the stole. Lord North, who from his anxiety to supply the void occasioned by Fox's absence took part in every discussion, immediately intimated his intention of moving to insert the names of the princes of the...
Page 227 - He knows that he dares not risk it. Notwithstanding his high character and his influence within these walls, he would not be supported by twenty members." " The claim itself," continued Fox, " has been disavowed in another assembly, by an exalted personage, in his brother's name, so that truly to describe the case, the preamble of the bill must run thus : ' Whereas the Prince of Wales has never claimed any right to the Regency, it becomes necessary for the Peers and Commons of England to declare...
Page 254 - ... disconnecting the authority to command service, from the power of animating it by reward ; and for allotting to the Prince all the invidious duties of government, without the means of softening them to the public by any one act of grace, favour, or benignity.
Page 227 - Wales, being heir apparent, and of full age and capacity, has no more right to exercise the royal authority, during his majesty's incapacity, than any other individual subject." The right honourable gentleman well knew, that he dared not venture to subject such a question to debate : he well knew, that, with all his majorities, he could not risk it; he well knew, that if he could...
Page 330 - It may not be unworthy of notice', that a merry ballad, called Lillibullero, being at this time published in derision of the Papists and the Irish, it was greedily received by the people, and was sung by all ranks of men, even by the king's army, who were strongly seized with the national spirit. This incident both discovered and served to increase the general discontent of the kingdom.
Page 180 - ... us from that unhappy course, but it kept the English fleet in the river : so that it was not possible for them to come out, though they were come down as far as to the Gunfleet. By this means we had the sea open to us, with a fair wind and a safe navigation.
Page 136 - Ellis was going to open, sent him an order to sit down. All their magnanimous threats ended in a ridiculous vote of censure, and a still more ridiculous address to the King. This shameful desertion so afflicted the generous mind of George the third, that he was obliged to live upon potatoes for three weeks, to keep off a malignant fever.

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